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Math Help - solve these two system of differential equation

  1. #1
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    solve these two system of differential equation

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  2. #2
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    #2:

    I get the following solutions for the respective DE's:

    x=C_{1}e^{5t}-\frac{1}{3}e^{2t}-\frac{3}{5}y

    y=2e^{t}+2xt+C_{2}

    z=e^{t}+t(x+y)+C_{3}

    Perhaps that is something for you to start with.
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  3. #3
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    not sure

    i m just not familiar with how to do the second question...

    would you post your steps?
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  4. #4
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    I am sorry, but I done that with my calculator. I just ran it through the calculator to show you what to shoot for.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by szpengchao View Post
    for your first question, since \lambda is not an eigenvalue of A, the matrix \lambda I -A is invertible. let \bold{u}=(\lambda I - A)^{-1} \bold{v},

    and \bold{x}(t)=e^{\lambda t}\bold{u}. then \frac{d \bold{x}}{dt}=\lambda e^{\lambda t}\bold{u}=\lambda \bold{x}, and hence:  \frac{d \bold{x}}{dt} - A \bold{x} = (\lambda I - A)\bold{x}=e^{\lambda t}(\lambda I - A)\bold{u}=e^{\lambda t}\bold{v}, which is

    what you were asked to prove. now, the example in your first question should be very easy for you to do!


    for the second question, call the first differential equation (1), the second (2) and the third (3). first differentiate

    both sides of (1) with respect to t to get: x'' = 5x' + 3y' + 2e^{2t}. call this (4). now plug y' from (2) into (4) to get

    x'' - 5x' - 6x = 6e^t + 2e^{2t}, which is a simple linear equation and gives you the general solution for x. now that we

    have x, we can easily find y and z, because by (1): y=\frac{x'-5x-e^{2t}}{3}, and by (3): z=\int(x + y + e^t)dt. \ \ \ \square
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