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Math Help - Limits in equation --->Infinity question

  1. #1
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    Limits in equation --->Infinity question

    I've seen the Limit set to zero to solve the equation, but here I have infinity. How should I approach it?

    \lim_{x\to infinity}\frac{5x^2-17}{x^2+2}
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  2. #2
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    \frac{{5x^2  - 17}}{{x^2  + 2}} = \frac{{5 - \frac{{17}}{{x^2 }}}}{{1 + \frac{2}{{x^2 }}}}
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plato View Post
    \frac{{5x^2  - 17}}{{x^2  + 2}} = \frac{{5 - \frac{{17}}{{x^2 }}}}{{1 + \frac{2}{{x^2 }}}}
    So looking at this problem I should be able to "zero" out the denominators and my answer should just be \frac{5}{1}=5? Am I understanding correctly?
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    That is correct.
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