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Math Help - The derivative

  1. #1
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    The derivative

    Can someone please help me find the derivative of the following h(t)=s^2t+s
    I've tried it, but I always get the wrong answer, I get h'(t)=s^2+s



    Thank you!
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  2. #2
    is up to his old tricks again! Jhevon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coach View Post
    Can someone please help me find the derivative of the following h(t)=s^2t+s
    I've tried it, but I always get the wrong answer, I get h'(t)=s^2+s



    Thank you!
    s is a constant, is it not? what is the derivative of a constant?
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  3. #3
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    0, I guess.




    but according to my book the answer is h'(t)=s^2
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  4. #4
    is up to his old tricks again! Jhevon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coach View Post
    0, I guess.




    but according to my book the answer is h'(t)=s^2
    because the derivative of the lone s is zero, as you just said...why are you guessing by the way?
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  5. #5
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    Ok, but I thought, that since h is a function of t, I should only derivate t, and since t becomes 1, then s remains.




    I am guessing, because I usually get it wrong, and I am not sure about it(though I am sure that the derivative of a constant is zero).








    But thank you so much!
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  6. #6
    is up to his old tricks again! Jhevon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coach View Post
    Ok, but I thought, that since h is a function of t, I should only derivate t, and since t becomes 1, then s remains.
    not when s is by itself. the derivative of h(t) = 2t + 1 = 2 for instance. the t goes to one, you leave it's coefficient, but the 1 goes to zero, because it is a constant
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