Results 1 to 2 of 2

Math Help - Using definite integrals to represent area

  1. #1
    Newbie
    Joined
    Jul 2014
    From
    USA
    Posts
    1

    Using definite integrals to represent area

    Hi I am very confused about this problem:

    The question is asking to come up with a Riemann sum, then a definite integral to represent the area of the region shown using the strip method. I'm very confused about what my limits should be for the definite integral and am unsure how to go about solving this... Thank you!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Using definite integrals to represent area-image.jpg  
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  2. #2
    Member
    Joined
    Jul 2014
    From
    Waterloo, ON
    Posts
    82
    Thanks
    18

    Re: Using definite integrals to represent area

    It seems that you are doing it in terms of y. This is the area of a quarter of a circle in the first quadrant, so for y, the value should go from 0 to √10.
    We also have to express the function in terms of x:
    x^2+y^2=10, x^2=10-y^2 so f(y)=√(10-y^2)
    The area using definite integral, then, should be A = (lim n->∞) (√10 /n) Σ (i=0~n) f(<√10>/n * i).

    I hope I'm right...?
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

Similar Math Help Forum Discussions

  1. Replies: 3
    Last Post: April 7th 2014, 12:52 PM
  2. Replies: 2
    Last Post: February 24th 2014, 09:00 PM
  3. Replies: 4
    Last Post: April 13th 2011, 02:08 AM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: December 18th 2010, 01:12 PM
  5. Replies: 4
    Last Post: February 19th 2010, 02:07 AM

Search Tags


/mathhelpforum @mathhelpforum