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Math Help - Converting from exponential to polar form

  1. #1
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    Question Converting from exponential to polar form

    I would really appreciate some help/working on this. please view attached or view the link.

    http://i.imgur.com/LraAmqE.png
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Converting from exponential to polar form-math-q6.png  
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  2. #2
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    Re: Converting from exponential to polar form

    Hey Brennox.

    Recall that r^2 = x^2 + u^2 and theta = arctan(y/x).

    With the limits you need to basically look at lower and upper limits of x and y and substitute the values of theta and r given those limits.

    When y = 0 what does r equal? What about when y = SQRT(36 - x^2)?

    It might help you to first draw your original region of integration on some paper and then use this to derive your region in terms of polar co-ordinates.

    If you have a circular region, then r is constant. If it changes, then see how it changes with regards to the angle theta.

    Also remember that in multivariable substitutions, you need to calculate the Jacobian.
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  3. #3
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    Re: Converting from exponential to polar form

    oh thanks, does e^(x^2+y^2) translate into re^r^2?
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  4. #4
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    Re: Converting from exponential to polar form

    ermmm when y = SQRT(36-x^2), r or 'A' = 6?
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  5. #5
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    Re: Converting from exponential to polar form

    Yeah it should be e^(r^2)*r if you factor in the Jacobian.
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