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Math Help - Convergent or Divergent

  1. #1
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    Convergent or Divergent

    \int_{-\infty}^{-1} e^{-26t}dt

    This is my work:
    \lim_{a \rightarrow -\infty}\int_{a}^{-1} e^{-26t}=\lim_{a \rightarrow -\infty}\left[-\frac{1}{26}e^{-26t}\right]_a^{-1}=\lim_{a \rightarrow -\infty}\left[-\frac{1}{26}\left(e^{26}-e^{-26a}\right)\right]

    \lim_{a \rightarrow -\infty}e^x =0 so it would converge to -\frac{1}{26}e^{26} but that's not the correct answer. Can someone explain to me where I went wrong?
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  2. #2
    Junior Member
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    Re: Convergent or Divergent

    I think I know what I did wrong. (-26)(-\infty)=+\infty making it divergent
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