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Math Help - prove there exists an inverse function

  1. #1
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    prove there exists an inverse function

    Hello. I'm quite new to calculus and frankly speaking I'm an autodidact. Could you tell me how to solve this:


    f: [\frac{\pi}{2}, \pi) \ni x \rightarrow \frac{1}{sinx} \in R

    Prove that there exists a inverese of f. In what set is f^{-1} differentiable? Calculate f^{-1'}



    I would really appreciate a thorough explanation. Thank you.
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  2. #2
    Senior Member jakncoke's Avatar
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    Re: prove there exists an inverse function

    Well, you could easily show that on the interval  [\frac{\pi}{2}, \pi) , f is monotonously increasing, since f'(x) exists on the interval, it is continuous on the interval. A continous function which is monotously increasing or decreasing is one to one on that interval and thus also has an inverse. Now if f is differentiable on the interval,  f^{-1} is also differentiable given that  f'(x) \not = 0 at any point on the interval. You can verify that this is true. Thus  f^{-1} is differentiable over  [\frac{\pi}{2}, \pi)
    Last edited by jakncoke; December 18th 2012 at 10:31 AM.
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