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Math Help - Did I use log differentiation right?

  1. #1
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    Did I use log differentiation right?

     y = \frac{4}{3}x^{\frac{3}{4}-\pi}

     ln(y) = ln(\frac{4}{3}x^{\frac{3}{4}-\pi})

     ln(y) = ({\frac{3}{4}-\pi})ln(\frac{4}{3}x)

     \frac{1}{y}\frac{dy}{dx} = (\frac{3}{4}-\pi(\frac{d}{dx}(ln(\frac{4}{3}x))))

     \frac{1}{y}\frac{dy}{dx} = (\frac{3}{4}-\pi)(\frac{3}{4}x)*(\frac{4}{3})

     \frac{dy}{dx} = y(\frac{3}{4}x-\pi(x))

     \frac{dy}{dx} = \frac{4}{3}x^{\frac{3}{4}-\pi}(\frac{3}{4}x-\pi(x))
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    Re: Did I use log differentiation right?

    Quote Originally Posted by AZach View Post
     \frac{1}{y}\frac{dy}{dx} = (\frac{3}{4}-\pi)(\frac{3}{4}x)*(\frac{4}{3})
    You mean,

     \frac{1}{y}\frac{dy}{dx} = (\frac{3}{4}-\pi)(\frac{3}{4x})*(\frac{4}{3})
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    Re: Did I use log differentiation right?

    No, you incorrectly applied a certain log property, specifically:

    \log_a(bc^d)\ne d\cdot\log_a(bc)

    Since the exponent is a constant, you should just use the power rule to differentiate, unless specifically instructed to use logs.
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    Re: Did I use log differentiation right?

    Hello, AZach!

    \text{Differentiate: }\:y \:=\: \tfrac{4}{3}x^{\frac{3}{4}-\pi}

    Why are you using log differentiation?
    The exponent is a constant.

    Or did you mean: . y \:=\:\tfrac{4}{3}x^{\frac{3}{4}-x}
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    Re: Did I use log differentiation right?

    Quote Originally Posted by Soroban View Post
    Hello, AZach!


    Why are you using log differentiation?
    The exponent is a constant.

    Or did you mean: . y \:=\:\tfrac{4}{3}x^{\frac{3}{4}-x}
    For some reason I was thinking  \pi was a variable.

    For a problem like this would I use log differentiation?

     y =  \frac{4}{3}x^{\frac{3}{4}-x}

     ln (y) =  ln (\frac{4}{3}x^{\frac{3}{4}-x})

     ln (y) =  ln (\frac{4}{3}) + ({\frac{3}{4}-x})ln(x)

     \frac{1}{y}\frac{dy}{dx} =  \frac{3}{4} + (-1)ln(x) + (\frac{3}{4}-x)*(\frac{1}{x})

     \frac{dy}{dx} = y( \frac{3}{4} -ln(x) + \frac{3}{4x}-1)

     \frac{dy}{dx} = (\frac{4}{3}x^{\frac{3}{4}-x}) * ( \frac{3}{4} -ln(x) + \frac{3}{4x}-1)

    Does that look correct?
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    Re: Did I use log differentiation right?

    Quote Originally Posted by AZach View Post
     y = \frac{4}{3}x^{\frac{3}{4}-\pi}
    I had the exact same question as Soroban.
    y' =\left(\frac{3}{4}-\pi\right)\left( \frac{4}{3}x^{-\frac{1}{4}-\pi}\right)
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    Re: Did I use log differentiation right?

    Quote Originally Posted by AZach View Post
    For a problem like this would I use log differentiation?

     y =  \frac{4}{3}x^{\frac{3}{4}-x}

     ln (y) =  ln (\frac{4}{3}x^{\frac{3}{4}-x})

     ln (y) =  ln (\frac{4}{3}) + ({\frac{3}{4}-x})ln(x)

     \frac{1}{y}\frac{dy}{dx} =  \frac{3}{4} + (-1)ln(x) + (\frac{3}{4}-x)*(\frac{1}{x})

    ...

    Does that look correct?
    Nearly. Just in case a picture helps...



    differentiate 4/3 x^(3/4 - x) - Wolfram|Alpha (Click on 'show steps'.)

    Key in spoiler...

    Spoiler:


    is the chain rule for two inner functions, i.e...

    \frac{d}{dx}\ f(u(x), v(x)) = \frac{\partial f}{\partial u} \frac{du}{dx} + \frac{\partial f}{\partial v} \frac{dv}{dx}

    As with...



    ... the ordinary chain rule, straight continuous lines differentiate downwards (integrate up) with respect to x, and the straight dashed line similarly but with respect to the (corresponding) dashed balloon expression which is (one of) the inner function(s) of the composite expression.





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