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Math Help - Can not find critical points for turning points.

  1. #1
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    Can not find critical points for turning points.

    Is there any possible way that the critical points for an equation can be found out short of find when the equation = 0, or is not defined?

    The equation I have is

    3x^2 - 2x - 6

    I can't figure out how to factor it, and it's also just undefinable if it's put through the quadratic equation.

    So I have no idea how I'm supposed to find the critical points. I know there has to be two turning points seeing as it's third degree, but can't figure out what I should be doing..
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  2. #2
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    Re: Can not find critical points for turning points.

    Quote Originally Posted by astuart View Post
    Is there any possible way that the critical points for an equation can be found out short of find when the equation = 0, or is not defined?

    The equation I have is

    3x^2 - 2x - 6

    I can't figure out how to factor it, and it's also just undefinable if it's put through the quadratic equation.

    So I have no idea how I'm supposed to find the critical points. I know there has to be two turning points seeing as it's third degree, but can't figure out what I should be doing..
    I don't know what you mean undefineable in the quadratic formula it gives

    x=\frac{2 \pm \sqrt{4-4(3)(-6)}}{6}=\frac{1 \pm \sqrt{19}}{3}
    Thanks from astuart
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  3. #3
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    Re: Can not find critical points for turning points.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheEmptySet View Post
    I don't know what you mean undefineable in the quadratic formula it gives

    x=\frac{2 \pm \sqrt{4-4(3)(-6)}}{6}=\frac{1 \pm \sqrt{19}}{3}
    Well it certainly does. I forgot the minus sign, so was getting a negative underneath the square root.

    Thanks!
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