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Math Help - Continuity and continuous functions

  1. #1
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    Continuity and continuous functions

    Hi,
    Would anyone be able to tell me how I'd go about obtaining this answer? Here's what I've done so far.

    -2(x) + b => -2(2) + b => -4 + b (from the left side)

    -24/x-b => -24/(2)-b (from the right side)

    the part/step I don't understand is when you add them together and come out with . . .

    (-4+b)(2-b) = -24 ??? How do you come up with this?

    I know the next step is multiply out and move -24 to the left so that you set it to = 0.

    -8+4b+2b-b2 =-24
    -(b2-6b+8)=-24
    b2-6b+8=24
    b2-6b-16 = 0
    (b-8)(b+2) = 0

    So the answer to this problem is b=8 (because it has a greater absolute value than 2)

    Hope this isn't confusing to anyone reading this. Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thanks, Ana



    Here's the problem
    There are exactly two values for b which make f (x) a continuous function at x = 2. The one with the greater absolute value is b=?

    Continuity and continuous functions-fbfde4023031f2739d578fd94128101.png
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  2. #2
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    Re: Continuity and continuous functions

    Quote Originally Posted by phenol View Post
    Here's the problem
    There are exactly two values for b which make f (x) a continuous function at x = 2. The one with the greater absolute value is b=?
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	fbfde4023031f2739d578fd94128101.png 
Views:	11 
Size:	1.5 KB 
ID:	25029
    If that is the correct problem then b=8\text{ or }b=-2.
    Thanks from phenol
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  3. #3
    MHF Contributor

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    Re: Continuity and continuous functions

    Quote Originally Posted by phenol View Post
    Hi,
    Would anyone be able to tell me how I'd go about obtaining this answer? Here's what I've done so far.

    -2(x) + b => -2(2) + b => -4 + b (from the left side)

    -24/x-b => -24/(2)-b (from the right side)

    the part/step I don't understand is when you add them together and come out with . . .
    You don't "add them together"- especially when talking about mathematics don't use the term "add" to mean just combing two things!
    What you mean is "in order to be continuous those two one sided limits must be the same so -4+ b= -24/(2- b).


    (-4+b)(2-b) = -24 ??? How do you come up with this?
    Multiply by both sides by 2- b.

    I know the next step is multiply out and move -24 to the left so that you set it to = 0.

    -8+4b+2b-b2 =-24
    -(b2-6b+8)=-24
    b2-6b+8=24
    b2-6b-16 = 0
    (b-8)(b+2) = 0

    So the answer to this problem is b=8 (because it has a greater absolute value than 2)

    Hope this isn't confusing to anyone reading this. Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thanks, Ana



    Here's the problem
    There are exactly two values for b which make f (x) a continuous function at x = 2. The one with the greater absolute value is b=?

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	fbfde4023031f2739d578fd94128101.png 
Views:	11 
Size:	1.5 KB 
ID:	25029
    Thanks from phenol
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

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