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Math Help - Maths for Physics

  1. #1
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    Maths for Physics

    Hey Guys can you give me some guiding points for a few questions. Trying to refresh myself with doing this kind of work.

    1 I) Find Integral of 1/(Cos^2(X)) and 1/(Sin^2(X))

    II) Integrate Cos(X)+ [Sin(X)] DX with limits Pie and -Pie. I know the answer is 4 for this but can't get the working right.

    III) Similarly Integrate ([u-1]+[u+1]) DU with limits 4 and -3.

    With [] symbolosing postive squareroots.

    Thanks for any help and apologies for the lay out but any help would be greatly appreciated.
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  2. #2
    GJA
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    Re: Maths for Physics

    Hi, Mathsnewbie. I will try to point in the right direction on the first exercise of your post.

    You may find that \frac{1}{\sin(x)}=\csc(x) and \frac{1}{\cos(x)}=\sec(x) are relevant. The table involving trig functions and their derivtives at Differentiation of trigonometric functions - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia may also be of some use. I think this (along with the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, i.e. taking antiderivatives) is enough to finish off the exercise.

    If this is too cryptic let me know and I will try to be more explicit with my hints. Good luck!
    Last edited by GJA; August 1st 2012 at 09:57 PM.
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  3. #3
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    Re: Maths for Physics

    This is great thank you!
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  4. #4
    GJA
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    Re: Maths for Physics

    No problemo. Were you able to get parts II and III?
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  5. #5
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    Re: Maths for Physics

    Quote Originally Posted by Mathsnewbie View Post
    ...
    II) Integrate Cos(X)+ [Sin(X)] DX with limits Pie and -Pie ...
    fyi, this is pi ...




    ... and this is pie

    Thanks from awkward
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  6. #6
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    Re: Maths for Physics

    I managed to get II but struggling with III at the moment.
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  7. #7
    GJA
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    Re: Maths for Physics

    Good job! Keep at it, and if you're totally stumped I can send some thoughts that may put you back on course.
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  8. #8
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    Re: Maths for Physics

    Would I be right in saying 7 for part III)


    My working is


    Integral with limits 4,0 (u-1)+(u+1)du + Integral with limits 0,-3 (-u-1)+(-u+1)du


    So I get Integral 2uDu + Integral -2uDu with limits 4,0 and 0.-3 respectively


    Which equals (U)4,0 + (-U)0,3Which = 4-0 + (0-(-3) = 7
    Last edited by Mathsnewbie; August 3rd 2012 at 03:30 AM.
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