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Math Help - Calculus heavy physics problem

  1. #1
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    Calculus heavy physics problem

    A 5.00 crate is suspended from the end of a short vertical rope of negligible mass. An upward force is applied to the end of the rope, and the height of the crate above its initial position is given by +(0.61 )

    What is the magnitude of the force when 3.60 ?

    Alright, I have done about 20 physics problems that are due next week, and this is the last one. It is very heavy on calculus, which i am not good at. In fact, I don't even really know where to start on this one. Thanks for the help.
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  2. #2
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    Re: Calculus heavy physics problem

    Quote Originally Posted by CrusaderKing1 View Post
    A 5.00 crate is suspended from the end of a short vertical rope of negligible mass. An upward force is applied to the end of the rope, and the height of the crate above its initial position is given by +(0.61 )

    What is the magnitude of the force when 3.60 ?

    Alright, I have done about 20 physics problems that are due next week, and this is the last one. It is very heavy on calculus, which i am not good at. In fact, I don't even really know where to start on this one. Thanks for the help.
    y(t) = 2.80t + 0.61t^3

    surely you know how to take derivatives of polynomial expressions ...

    a(t) = y''(t)

    F(t) = m \cdot a(t)
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    Re: Calculus heavy physics problem

    Quote Originally Posted by skeeter View Post
    y(t) = 2.80t + 0.61t^3

    surely you know how to take derivatives of polynomial expressions ...

    a(t) = y''(t)

    F(t) = m \cdot a(t)
    Yes, If the question said use the derivative, and then find F(t), I would have understood it. I am very bad at starting problems!

    Ok, I did derive the function and received 20.6848 for acceleration, with then multiplied by 5.00 kg = 103.424

    Would the units be in N? Probably N right? Yes, I'm not very good at this yet.

    Thanks for your help! Much appreciated.
    Last edited by CrusaderKing1; October 11th 2011 at 08:26 AM.
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  4. #4
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    Re: Calculus heavy physics problem

    Quote Originally Posted by CrusaderKing1 View Post
    Yes, If the question said use the derivative, and then find F(t), I would have understood it. I am very bad at starting problems!

    Ok, I did derive the function and received 20.6848 for acceleration, with then multiplied by 5.00 kg = 103.424

    Would the units be in N? Probably N right? Yes, I'm not very good at this yet.

    Thanks for your help! Much appreciated.
    incorrect

    a(6) = 21.96 \, m/s^2 ... recheck your calculations

    at this level of calculus-based physics, you are expected to know the relationship between position, velocity, and acceleration ...

    v(t) = y'(t)

    a(t) = v'(t) = y''(t)
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    Re: Calculus heavy physics problem

    Quote Originally Posted by skeeter View Post
    incorrect

    a(6) = 21.96 \, m/s^2 ... recheck your calculations

    at this level of calculus-based physics, you are expected to know the relationship between position, velocity, and acceleration ...

    v(t) = y'(t)

    a(t) = v'(t) = y''(t)
    65.88 N

    I didn't realize that I need to derive the function twice.

    I have calculus and physics this semester, and had only high school trig. before 5 weeks ago.

    The value is definitely right, but the program(masteringphysics) won't accept "N" as the correct units.

    would kg*m/s2 work?

    Thanks.
    Last edited by CrusaderKing1; October 11th 2011 at 12:54 PM.
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  6. #6
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    Re: Calculus heavy physics problem

    Quote Originally Posted by CrusaderKing1 View Post
    65.88 N

    I didn't realize that I need to derive the function twice.

    I have calculus and physics this semester, and had only high school trig. before 5 weeks ago.

    The value is definitely right, but the program(masteringphysics) won't accept "N" as the correct units.

    would kg*m/s2 work?
    Thanks.
    Not being familiar with what the "machine" wants, I can't really say ... it's worth a shot.
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    Re: Calculus heavy physics problem

    Quote Originally Posted by skeeter View Post
    Not being familiar with what the "machine" wants, I can't really say ... it's worth a shot.
    yes, I guess so.
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