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Math Help - Methods of Integration Query (acronyms for when to apply particular techniques)

  1. #1
    Senior Member bugatti79's Avatar
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    Methods of Integration Query (acronyms for when to apply particular techniques)

    Folks,
    Does any1 have an acronym to remember the different methods if integration like substitution, by parts, reduction formula, inverse trig etc.
    Or a useful way to determine which is the best approach to solve a particular integral? Just a thought

    Thanks
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  2. #2
    A Plied Mathematician
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    For by-parts, remember ILATE:

    Inverse Trig
    Logarithmic
    Algebraic
    Trig
    Expponential

    Whichever function is higher on the list gets to be u, and whichever is lower on the list, plus the existing differential, gets to be dv.
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  3. #3
    Senior Member bugatti79's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ackbeet View Post
    For by-parts, remember ILATE:

    Inverse Trig
    Logarithmic
    Algebraic
    Trig
    Expponential

    Whichever function is higher on the list gets to be u, and whichever is lower on the list, plus the existing differential, gets to be dv.
    Yes I was aware of this for 'by parts'. Interestingly wiki has it LIATE.

    Thanks
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  4. #4
    A Plied Mathematician
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    Quote Originally Posted by bugatti79 View Post
    Yes I was aware of this for 'by parts'. Interestingly wiki has it LIATE.

    Thanks
    True, although later on down, they mention ILATE as an alternative that many people prefer (I definitely prefer it).

    For trig substitutions, I always draw a right triangle, and assign sides based on this rule:

    1. If the expression looks like x^{2}+y^{2}, then one side is x, and the other y, and the hypotenuse is \sqrt{x^{2}+y^{2}}. Which side is x and which is y doesn't materially matter, though sometimes one way might be easier than the other.

    2. If the expression looks like x^{2}-y^{2}, then x is the hypotenuse, y is one of the sides, and the other side is \sqrt{x^{2}-y^{2}}. Which side is y doesn't materially matter, though sometimes one way might be easier than the other.

    You go through with the integration. If it's a definite integral, I'll often do the whole thing in the angle domain (after transforming the limits, the integrand, and the differential). If it's an indefinite integral, I'll use the triangle again to get back to the original variables.

    By-parts corresponds to the product rule for derivatives, substitutions correspond to the chain rule. Incidentally, there is an analogy for the quotient rule:

    \int\frac{fg'-gf'}{f^{2}}\,dx=\frac{g}{f}+C.

    Unfortunately, it's not all that useful, because the exact form there is not all that common.
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  5. #5
    Senior Member bugatti79's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ackbeet View Post
    True, although later on down, they mention ILATE as an alternative that many people prefer (I definitely prefer it).

    For trig substitutions, I always draw a right triangle, and assign sides based on this rule:

    1. If the expression looks like x^{2}+y^{2}, then one side is x, and the other y, and the hypotenuse is \sqrt{x^{2}+y^{2}}. Which side is x and which is y doesn't materially matter, though sometimes one way might be easier than the other.

    2. If the expression looks like x^{2}-y^{2}, then x is the hypotenuse, y is one of the sides, and the other side is \sqrt{x^{2}-y^{2}}. Which side is y doesn't materially matter, though sometimes one way might be easier than the other.

    You go through with the integration. If it's a definite integral, I'll often do the whole thing in the angle domain (after transforming the limits, the integrand, and the differential). If it's an indefinite integral, I'll use the triangle again to get back to the original variables.

    By-parts corresponds to the product rule for derivatives, substitutions correspond to the chain rule. Incidentally, there is an analogy for the quotient rule:

    \int\frac{fg'-gf'}{f^{2}}\,dx=\frac{g}{f}+C.

    Unfortunately, it's not all that useful, because the exact form there is not all that common.
    Ok, I didnt know that, thats interesting. Just have to find some examples and try it out. Thanks alot!
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  6. #6
    A Plied Mathematician
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    You're welcome!
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