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Math Help - A silly question

  1. #1
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    A silly question

    A silly question
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails A silly question-june34.gif  
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    is up to his old tricks again! Jhevon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by curvature View Post
    A silly question
    \partial... means partial derivative

    we say that \frac { \partial f}{ \partial x} is "the partial derivative of f with respect to x"

    is that what you mean?
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    You say "partial derivative of .... to respect to ... "

    Note: I am not really sure from where this symbol is taken from. It is not Greek, I can say that.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jhevon View Post
    \partial... means partial derivative

    we say that \frac { \partial f}{ \partial x} is "the partial derivative of f with respect to x"

    is that what you mean?
    Thanks, but how do you pronounce the letter \partial?
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    Quote Originally Posted by curvature View Post
    Thanks, but how do you pronounce the letter \partial?
    "partial"
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThePerfectHacker View Post
    "partial"
    Can we say partial f over partial x for the notation?
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    is up to his old tricks again! Jhevon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by curvature View Post
    Can we say partial f over partial x for the notation?
    no, we say "the partial of f with respect to x"

    are you looking for a short phrase? for instance, for \frac {dy}{dx} virtually no one says "the derivative of y with respect to x" most people just say "dy dx." is it something like this you are looking for?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jhevon View Post
    no, we say "the partial of f with respect to x"

    are you looking for a short phrase? for instance, for \frac {dy}{dx} virtually no one says "the derivative of y with respect to x" most people just say "dy dx." is it something like this you are looking for?
    Thank you so much.
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    Quote Originally Posted by curvature View Post
    Can we say partial f over partial x for the notation?
    Another way of reading this is:

    "partial of x over partial of y" or "partial d of x over partial d of y"

    RonL
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThePerfectHacker View Post
    You say "partial derivative of .... to respect to ... "

    Note: I am not really sure from where this symbol is taken from. It is not Greek, I can say that.
    Hello,

    have a look here: Partial derivative - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    By the way: Your signature should be printed like this:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails A silly question-thp_sign.gif  
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThePerfectHacker View Post
    You say "partial derivative of .... to respect to ... "

    Note: I am not really sure from where this symbol is taken from. It is not Greek, I can say that.

    It is from the Cyrillic alphabet.
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    Quote Originally Posted by earboth View Post
    By the way: Your signature should be printed like this:
    You can make that print in LaTeX?
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThePerfectHacker View Post
    You can make that print in LaTeX?
    Hi,

    I'm going to try:

    <br />
\mathfrak{Diophantine~ equation@:~ A ~child ~can~ under]and, ~only ~a ~ma]er~ can ~solve.}<br />

    Obviously no . So sorry!

    You have to use a typographically correct font with 2 different characters of "s" depending where it is placed in the word. Additionally you have to use ligatures between "s" and "t", double "l" (that's a lower case of a capital L), "f" and "t" and in German there are a few characteristical combinations of letters: "sch" or "ch" or "ck"...etc.
    In the font I use (it is obviously not the font \mathfrak{Fraktura} of the MHF) you find those exceptional characters at places of brackets or the @-sign.
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