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Math Help - Taylor Series

  1. #1
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    Taylor Series

    Hey, I don't have an exact problem that needs to be solved, but I do have this presentation to give on the Taylor Series. Can anyone explain in layman's terms what this abstract concept represents? Maybe you can provide an example also? Please, I need all the help I can get
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    is up to his old tricks again! Jhevon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MathMage89 View Post
    Hey, I don't have an exact problem that needs to be solved, but I do have this presentation to give on the Taylor Series. Can anyone explain in layman's terms what this abstract concept represents? Maybe you can provide an example also? Please, I need all the help I can get
    what research have you done so far. have you googled "Taylor series"?, have you tried wikipedia?

    is there anything in particulr that you don't get about Taylor series?
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  3. #3
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    Red face

    I don't understand really what its purpose is. I understand that it's an approximation, but of what I don't know. Are there any number solutions or are the answers just infinite summations? Determining the general formula at the beginning, I also do not understand.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MathMage89 View Post
    Hey, I don't have an exact problem that needs to be solved, but I do have this presentation to give on the Taylor Series. Can anyone explain in layman's terms what this abstract concept represents? Maybe you can provide an example also? Please, I need all the help I can get
    I am sure you are convinced that polynomials the the easiest functions to integrate and differenciate. In fact you can do it again and again, with not problem.

    The idea is that we express some function, which is not a polynomial, as a Taylor series. Now a Taylor series is simply an infinite polynomial. And since it is easy to work with polynomials it becomes easier to work with this function.
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