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Math Help - Hard limit problem

  1. #1
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    Hard limit problem

    I know that the answer to this limit is -.5, but I can't prove it algebraically. I know that I have to mutiply by "1" somehow, but I've tried many conjugates, etc, and I just can't get anywhere. (It's hard to read, but it's supposed to be the limit as x approaches negative infinity...)

    lim x→-∞ ((-2)^x+3^x)/((-2)^(x+1)+3^(x+1) )
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  2. #2
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    That is just \displaystyle \lim _{x \to  - \infty } \frac{{1 + \left( {\frac{{ - 2}}<br />
{3}} \right)^{ - x} }}<br />
{{ - 2 + 3\left( {\frac{{ - 2}}<br />
{3}} \right)^{ - x} }}
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