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Math Help - Paramtrization and Line Integral

  1. #1
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    Paramtrization and Line Integral

    a) Parametrize the curve x^{\frac{2}{3}}+y^{\tfrac{2}{3}}=a^{\tfrac{2}{3}}\  \ in the standard counterclockwise sense.

    b) Evaluate  \text{F(x) = (}\tfrac{-1}{\sqrt[{3}]{{y}}}\text{ ,}\tfrac{1}{\sqrt[{3}]{{x}}}\text{ )} over one complete transversal of the above curve.

    _____________________

    My approach & Answer:

    a)

    x=a\text{ }\cos ^{3}t
    y=a\text{ }\sin ^{3}t
    0\text{ }\leq t\leq \text{ }2\pi


    b) Since the field is not conservative, we have to find the line integral (i.e. the answer is not zero)... My final answer is -6\pi a^{\tfrac{2}{3}}

    However, I think the negative sign is not correct because the force field is along the path of motion, meaning positive would make more sense...

    What do you think?
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  2. #2
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    I'm starting to doubt my answer. And nobody is offering any help...

    So here's another question.

    1. Is there a way I could verify my parametrization? Is there a good online grapher that does both regular and parametric graphing?

    And

    2. Even though I did the line integral by hand, is there an online integrator that could help in this case?

    Thanks in advance people.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by keysar7 View Post
    a) Parametrize the curve x^{\frac{2}{3}}+y^{\tfrac{2}{3}}=a^{\tfrac{2}{3}}\  \ in the standard counterclockwise sense.

    b) Evaluate  \text{F(x) = (}\tfrac{-1}{\sqrt[{3}]{{y}}}\text{ ,}\tfrac{1}{\sqrt[{3}]{{x}}}\text{ )} over one complete transversal of the above curve.

    _____________________

    My approach & Answer:

    a)

    x=a\text{ }\cos ^{3}t
    y=a\text{ }\sin ^{3}t
    0\text{ }\leq t\leq \text{ }2\pi


    b) Since the field is not conservative, we have to find the line integral (i.e. the answer is not zero)... My final answer is -6\pi a^{\tfrac{2}{3}}

    However, I think the negative sign is not correct because the force field is along the path of motion, meaning positive would make more sense...

    What do you think?
    The magnitude of your answer is correct. I don't know why you get a negative because I get 3 a^{2/3} \int_{t = 0}^{t = 2 \pi} \cos^2 (t) + \sin^2 (t) \, dt = 3 a^{2/3} (2 \pi - 0) = +6 \pi a^{2/3}.
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