Results 1 to 4 of 4

Math Help - Surface Integrals, Stokes Theorem, Divergence Theorem, all the same?

  1. #1
    Newbie
    Joined
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    15

    Surface Integrals, Stokes Theorem, Divergence Theorem, all the same?

    So am finishing up calc 3 and we are doing surface integrals, stokes' theorem, and divergence theorem.

    But solving all the problems gets really confusing because I feel like all the different methods get mixed up. For example, in my book for the section on Stokes' theorem they might say evaluate using Stokes' Theorem but they will use the line integral method.

    How do I know when I can use the method involving Curl F dS or F dr.
    I know I am probably not providing enough info, but I hope you guys know what I mean.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  2. #2
    Super Member 11rdc11's Avatar
    Joined
    Jul 2007
    From
    New Orleans
    Posts
    894
    Quote Originally Posted by wizrd54 View Post
    So am finishing up calc 3 and we are doing surface integrals, stokes' theorem, and divergence theorem.

    But solving all the problems gets really confusing because I feel like all the different methods get mixed up. For example, in my book for the section on Stokes' theorem they might say evaluate using Stokes' Theorem but they will use the line integral method.

    How do I know when I can use the method involving Curl F dS or F dr.
    I know I am probably not providing enough info, but I hope you guys know what I mean.
    It just depends, using Stokes Theorem makes the problem easier than taking the line integral. Normally the integration is alot easier and you don't have to worry about setting up you line integral correctly. Same thing with the divergence theorem. It is alot easier to use the divergence theorem than take the surface integral of each side.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  3. #3
    Newbie
    Joined
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    15
    I guess that makes a bit more sense.

    Are there Surface Integrals where you can't use Stokes' or the Divergence Theorem?

    I think it would help my understanding if you could tell me in what cases one method is better than the other. So the Divergence Theorem is good for finding surface integral of an object with many sides?
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  4. #4
    Super Member 11rdc11's Avatar
    Joined
    Jul 2007
    From
    New Orleans
    Posts
    894
    Quote Originally Posted by wizrd54 View Post
    I guess that makes a bit more sense.

    Are there Surface Integrals where you can't use Stokes' or the Divergence Theorem?

    I think it would help my understanding if you could tell me in what cases one method is better than the other. So the Divergence Theorem is good for finding surface integral of an object with many sides?
    The Divergence theorem only works for a completely closed surface, for example a sphere, cube, or any closed surface.

    So lets say you had to take the surface integral of a cube. It would be a pain because you would have do all 6 sides. Using the divergence thoerem it would be much easier because all you would do is take the divergence and then do a triple integral. Alot less work.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

Similar Math Help Forum Discussions

  1. [SOLVED] Simple Stokes' Theorem/surface integral problem
    Posted in the Calculus Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: January 20th 2011, 08:06 PM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: October 26th 2010, 06:20 PM
  3. Replies: 3
    Last Post: August 30th 2010, 04:06 AM
  4. Replies: 2
    Last Post: April 3rd 2010, 04:41 PM
  5. Flux integrals - verifying Stokes Theorem
    Posted in the Calculus Forum
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: August 20th 2009, 08:58 AM

Search Tags


/mathhelpforum @mathhelpforum