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Math Help - Sequence of limits of definite integrals

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    Sequence of limits of definite integrals

    Refer to the attachment: For the part that is underlined in red, on the right hand side of the equation why does the integral's limits go from -5 to 100 + 100 to 12? It isnt going in sequence (due to the 100 to 12) and that doesnt make sense
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    Last edited by TsAmE; May 12th 2010 at 05:10 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TsAmE View Post
    Refer to the attachment: For the part that is underlined in red, on the right hand side of the equation why does the integral's limits go from -5 to 100 + 100 to 12? It isnt going in sequence (due to the 100 to 12) and that doesnt make sense
    the property of integrals being used is \int_a^c f(x) \, dx + \int_c^b f(x) \, dx = \int_a^b f(x) \,dx

    the property does not state that c has to be between a and b
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    How do you know to use the 100 as your c, as you are given an integral with 10 as its limit? How would you know to choose between the 10 and 100?
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    Quote Originally Posted by TsAmE View Post
    How do you know to use the 100 as your c, as you are given an integral with 10 as its limit? How would you know to choose between the 10 and 100?
    because you only have one integral value with -5 as a limit of integration, and its other limit is 100.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TsAmE View Post
    How do you know to use the 100 as your c, as you are given an integral with 10 as its limit? How would you know to choose between the 10 and 100?
    Because it is given in the question.

    We are told

     \int_{100}^{-5} f(x) dx = 4

    Which is the same thing as saying

     - \int_{-5}^{100} f(x) dx = 4

    Going back to the question we want

     \int_{-5}^{12} f(x) dx

    Well...we know the value from -5 to 100, so lets use that. But to make this equal, we then need to go from 100 to 12! Therefore, we get

     \int_{-5}^{12} f(x) dx = \int_{-5}^{100}f(x)dx + \int_{100}^{12} f(x) dx

    We already know  \int_{-5}^{100} f(x)dx = -4 but we don't quite know the integral of 100 to 12...so let's break that guy up in the same way.

     \int_{100}^{12} f(x) dx   = \int_{100}^{-10} f(x)dx + \int_{100}^{12} f(x) dx

    Of course by reversing the limits we can find a numerical value.

    To re-state...we choose our limits given the definitions in the original question
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