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Math Help - Polar Coordinates

  1. #1
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    Polar Coordinates

    So I am just fiddling around with converting iterated integral into polar coordinates and I am just a bit stumped with this problem. I think I have figured it out, but I just wanted to make sure:

    Using polar coordinates, evaluate the integral which gives the area which lies in the first quadrant between the circles x^2+y^2 = 36 and x^2-6x+y^2 = 0

    After plugging in x=rcos\theta and y=rsin\theta I ended up with r^2 = 36 and r^2=6rcos\theta. I simplified them so r=6 and r=6cos\theta

    \int_{0}^{\pi/2}\int_{6cos\theta}^{6} r^2drd\theta \rightarrow \int_{0}^{\pi/2}\frac{r^3} {3}\mid_{6cos\theta}^{6}d\theta \rightarrow \int_{0}^{\pi/2}72 - 72cos^3\theta d\theta \rightarrow 72\int_{0}^{\pi/2} 1-cos^3\theta d\theta \rightarrow 72 - (72sin\theta - 24sin\theta) \mid_{0}^{\pi/2}

    After plugging in \pi/2 for \theta I ended up with 24. Have I done this right then? Thanks for all the help!
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spudwad View Post
    So I am just fiddling around with converting iterated integral into polar coordinates and I am just a bit stumped with this problem. I think I have figured it out, but I just wanted to make sure:

    Using polar coordinates, evaluate the integral which gives the area which lies in the first quadrant between the circles x^2+y^2 = 36 and x^2-6x+y^2 = 0

    After plugging in x=rcos\theta and y=rsin\theta I ended up with r^2 = 36 and r^2=6rcos\theta. I simplified them so r=6 and r=6cos\theta

    \int_{0}^{\pi/2}\int_{6cos\theta}^{6} r^2drd\theta \rightarrow \int_{0}^{\pi/2}\frac{r^3} {3}\mid_{6cos\theta}^{6}d\theta \rightarrow \int_{0}^{\pi/2}72 - 72cos^3\theta d\theta \rightarrow 72\int_{0}^{\pi/2} 1-cos^3\theta d\theta \rightarrow 72 - (72sin\theta - 24sin\theta) \mid_{0}^{\pi/2}

    After plugging in \pi/2 for \theta I ended up with 24. Have I done this right then? Thanks for all the help!
    No need for an integral, you can just use elementary geometry.

    First, it helps to write the circles in general form...

    x^2 + y^2 = 36, which has radius 6 units centred at the origin, and x^2 - 6x + y^2 = 0.

    The second can be rewritten as

    x^2 - 6x + (-3)^2 + y^2 = (-3)^2

    (x - 3)^2 + y^2 = 9.

    So it has radius 3 units centred at (3, 0).

    By drawing a graph of the situation, you have the required region as a quarter of the larger circle minus half of the smaller circle.


    So A = \frac{1}{4}\cdot \pi \cdot 6^2 - \frac{1}{2} \cdot \pi \cdot 3^2

     = 9\pi - \frac{9\pi}{2}

     = \frac{9\pi}{2}\,\textrm{units}^2
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