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Math Help - Limit representing the derivative

  1. #1
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    Limit representing the derivative

    This limit represents the derivative of some function f at some number a. State this a and f.



    How would you go about doing this? I understand that
    <br /> <br />
f'(a) = \lim_{x \to a} \frac{f(x) - f(a)}{x-a}<br />

    but, it doesn't seem to apply for this. any help is appreciated!
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by cdlegendary View Post
    This limit represents the derivative of some function f at some number a. State this a and f.



    How would you go about doing this? I understand that
    <br /> <br />
f'(a) = \lim_{x \to a} \frac{f(x) - f(a)}{x-a}<br />

    but, it doesn't seem to apply for this. any help is appreciated!
    Use this definition (which you should also have learned):

    f'(a) = \lim_{h \to 0} \frac{f(a + h) - f(a)}{h}
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