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Math Help - Use Cylindrical coordinates to find mass

  1. #1
    VkL
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    Use Cylindrical coordinates to find mass

    Use Cylindrical coordinates to find the mass of the solid region bound above by the plane  z=4, below by the paraboloid z=1-x^2-y^2 and on the side by the cylinder x^2+y^2 = 1 if the density is given by \rho(x,y,z)=k *sqrt{[(x^2+y^2)]}

    How would You set up the integral, I know the density goes in the integrand, but what are the limits of integration?
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  2. #2
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    limits

    Well, I think the limits would be as follows:

    z limit it bound by the plane and paraboloid.
    \int_{1-x^{2}-y^{2}}^4

    For the cylindrical coordinates: You need to go the entire way around the circel(if you look at the paraboloid from top down in a 2D perspective it looks like a circle), so \theta will go from 0 to 2\pi

    Next, what is the radius?...by looking at the cylinder equation its 1.
    \int_{0}^{1} \int_{0}^{2\pi}d\theta ,dr

    Overall, this the limits should be: \int{1-x^{2}-y^{2}}^{4}\int_{0}^{1} \int_{0}^{2\pi}d\theta ,dr,dz
    Just remember to change to cylindrical coordinates after you have completed the first integral which is in cartesian.

    Lastly, for checking your work, its pretty easy to use, I have an example written to get you started.
    http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i...dx+from+0+to+1
    Last edited by snaes; April 4th 2010 at 08:57 PM. Reason: latex typos
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