Results 1 to 6 of 6

Math Help - [SOLVED] Power/Taylor series centered at x = a

  1. #1
    Member
    Joined
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    107

    [SOLVED] Power/Taylor series centered at x = a

    Hi everyone. I am a senior in high school taking AP Calc BC and I have a question on Power Series. I just finished taking notes on Section 9.1 (Power Series) and 9.2 (Taylor Series) in this textbook: Amazon.com: Calculus: Graphical Numerical Algebraic (9780130631312): Ross L. Finney, Franklin Demana, Bert K. Waits, Daniel Kennedy: Books - Anyhow, my question is, why move a function's center? For example:

    Find the third order Taylor polynomial for f(x) = 2x^3 - 3x^2 + 4x - 5
    (a) at x = 0 (b) at x = 1

    (a) is already centered at x = 0.

    (b) I did Taylor series and got this: P_{3}(x) = 2(x-1)^3 + 3(x-1)^2 + 4(x-1) - 2

    I graphed out the two equations and they are exactly identical. So what is the point of moving the center? Not Answered

    Another question: is there a thread on using the [tex] tag? Answered

    Any help is appreciated. Thanks in advance.
    Last edited by lilaziz1; March 27th 2010 at 05:46 AM. Reason: [math] tags used
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  2. #2
    Junior Member
    Joined
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    44
    Quote Originally Posted by lilaziz1 View Post
    Another question: is there a thread on using the [tex] tag?
    I dont know anything about that center thing but you can find LaTex Tutorial from here at two sticky topics. --> http://www.mathhelpforum.com/math-help/latex-help/
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  3. #3
    Member
    Joined
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    107
    Thanks! now just 1 more question to go.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  4. #4
    Member
    Joined
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    107
    do u guys think my answer might be answered if i keep reading?
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  5. #5
    MHF Contributor
    skeeter's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2008
    From
    North Texas
    Posts
    11,694
    Thanks
    450
    Understand that Taylor polynomials are used as approximations for non-polynomial functions.

    A Taylor polynomial for a polynomial function is just that particular polynomial, no matter where it is centered, i.e nothing is gained by its representation.

    Try determining a Taylor polynomial for a non-polynomial function ... you'll se that the centering point will be the only point where the Taylor polynomial = the function of interest.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  6. #6
    Member
    Joined
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    107
    oh! like linearization! ty
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

Similar Math Help Forum Discussions

  1. power series centered at zero
    Posted in the Calculus Forum
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: May 16th 2010, 07:04 PM
  2. Replies: 4
    Last Post: May 6th 2010, 12:49 PM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: January 26th 2010, 08:06 AM
  4. Taylor + Power Series
    Posted in the Calculus Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: May 1st 2008, 09:26 AM
  5. [SOLVED] Power series centered at -1
    Posted in the Calculus Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: April 21st 2008, 10:54 PM

Search Tags


/mathhelpforum @mathhelpforum