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Math Help - Parametric Equations

  1. #1
    Member CalcGeek31's Avatar
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    Parametric Equations

    How do you find the parametric equation for a plane as would be used in a Line Integral?

    AKA

    How would you take the equation x+y+z=2 and form that into an r(t) equation?
    Last edited by CalcGeek31; January 17th 2010 at 09:55 AM.
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by CalcGeek31 View Post
    How do you find the parametric equation for a plane as would be used in a Line Integral?

    AKA

    How would you take the equation x+y+z=2 and form that into an r(t) equation?
    A plane requires two parameters. But you cannot take a line integral over a plane, no doubt you require the line integral around a curve IN the plane.

    Please post the entire question, not just the small bit you think you need help with.
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  3. #3
    Member CalcGeek31's Avatar
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    The question is a stoke's theorem one, I have to find it without using the curl but the S portion is a plane oriented upward. X+y+z=1
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    Quote Originally Posted by CalcGeek31 View Post
    The question is a stoke's theorem one, I have to find it without using the curl but the S portion is a plane oriented upward. X+y+z=1
    Again I ask, please post the whole question.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by CalcGeek31 View Post
    The question is a stoke's theorem one, I have to find it without using the curl but the S portion is a plane oriented upward. X+y+z=1
    Once again, this makes no sense. An entire plane is NOT a "portion" and does not have a boundary to apply Stoke's theorem to. I suspect that you have some region in the plane x+ y+ z= 1 that actually has a boundary and it is that boundary you want to integrate around and want parametric equations for.

    I can only second mr fantastic's plea that you post the entire problem. Until we know what region and what boundary you are talking about, we cannot help you.
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