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Math Help - parametrization

  1. #1
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    parametrization

    I'm not sure when my instructor covered this but i don't even know what the question is asking and what to even do...
    Find a parametrization for the line segment beginning at P1 and ending at P2


    Please and thank you
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by dizizviet View Post
    I'm not sure when my instructor covered this but i don't even know what the question is asking and what to even do...
    Find a parametrization for the line segment beginning at P1 and ending at P2


    Please and thank you
    Parametric equations for a straight line would be of the form x= at+ b, y= ct+ d, z= et+ f with t a variable.

    x goes from 1 to 0. Can you find x= at+ b so that when t=0, x= 1 and when t= 1, x= 0?

    y is always -2. Can you find y= ct+ d so that when t= 0, y= -2 and when t= 1, y= -2? (Yes, that is really easy!)

    z goes from 2 to 1/4. Can you find z= et+ f so that when t= 0, z= 2 and when t= 1, z= 1/4?

    (I just chose t= 0 and 1 at the two points to make it easy. There are many different parametric equations for a single line.)
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  3. #3
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    this may sound stupid but when i plug in those variables i what do i do with the a or b variable?
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    Here is the answer: \left( {1 - t, - 2,2 - \frac{7}{4}t} \right)

    Now you tell us why that is the answer.
    Last edited by mr fantastic; December 14th 2009 at 04:28 AM.
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  5. #5
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    i did the work..
    P1: (1,-2,2) P2: (0,-2,1/4)
    (1,-2,2)-(0,-2,1/4) = (1,0,7/4)
    (0,-2,1/4) + t(1,0,7/4) = (t,-2, 1/4 + 7/4t)
    But when i did this in reverse
    (0,-2,1/4) - (1,-2,2) = (-1,0,-7/4)
    (1,-2,2) + t(-1,0,-7/4) = (1-t,-2,2-7/4t)
    I got the answer but i was wondering why i had to put P2 first instead of P1... and how is the top equations that HallsofIvy gave to me doesn't seem to be used while i was working on this. Or was it being used without me even realizing it?
    And where is the rules at? i can't seem to find it....
    Last edited by mr fantastic; December 14th 2009 at 04:28 AM.
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