Results 1 to 4 of 4

Math Help - finding vertical tangent lines and reasoning

  1. #1
    Member
    Joined
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    79

    finding vertical tangent lines and reasoning

    Find vertical tangent lines of y=(2x-6)/(sqrt x^2+3). (how do you do square root symbols?)

    y'=[(12-12x)/(2sqrtx^2+)]/(x^2+3)

    (x^2+3)=0
    x=+or- (-sqrt3), x=complex number, so there are no vertical tangent lines?

    Edit: Or actually, (x^2+3) will never be zero, so the denominator would have to be a root function or a fraction to be a vertical tangent line?
    Last edited by hazecraze; October 15th 2009 at 10:25 AM.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  2. #2
    Super Member
    Joined
    Dec 2008
    From
    Scotland
    Posts
    901
    Quote Originally Posted by hazecraze View Post
    Find vertical tangent lines of y=(2x-6)/(sqrt x^2+3). (how do you do square root symbols?)

    y'=[(12-12x)/(2sqrtx^2+)]/(x^2+3)

    (x^2+3)=0
    x=+or- (-sqrt3), x=complex number, so there are no vertical tangent lines?

    Edit: Or actually, (x^2+3) will never be zero, so the denominator would have to be a root function or a fraction to be a vertical tangent line?
    There are no verticals, you are right.

    To do square roots, put backslash before the word sqrt.

    Also, to do a fraction, write \frac{numerator}{denominator}
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  3. #3
    Member
    Joined
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    79
    So the denominator would have to be a root function or a fraction to be a vertical tangent line?
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  4. #4
    Super Member
    Joined
    Dec 2008
    From
    Scotland
    Posts
    901
    Quote Originally Posted by hazecraze View Post
    So the denominator would have to be a root function or a fraction to be a vertical tangent line?
    In order for a function to have vertical asymptotes, there must be points at which the function is not defined.

    In functions like these, the most common 'cause' of a function being undefined is a divide by zero at for some value of x. Thus, yes, the denominator of such a function must be equal to zero at some value of x.

    There are other reasons why a function may be undefined, but in this type of example, you'd need some sort of division by 0, and that does not occur in the real plane for this function.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

Similar Math Help Forum Discussions

  1. Finding Vertical Tangent of Parametric Curve
    Posted in the Calculus Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: November 26th 2011, 11:04 AM
  2. find all vertical tangent lines of a curve
    Posted in the Calculus Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: October 4th 2010, 03:59 AM
  3. Finding Vertical Tangent lines
    Posted in the Calculus Forum
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: September 23rd 2009, 05:08 PM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: November 9th 2008, 05:13 PM
  5. Horizontal and Vertical Tangent Lines
    Posted in the Calculus Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: September 29th 2007, 04:28 PM

Search Tags


/mathhelpforum @mathhelpforum