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Math Help - How do I use the calculator to do these formula's

  1. #1
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    How do I use the calculator to do these formula's

    Can someone tell me what is the process on how to calculate the following examples on the calculator. In other words I don't know how to do these on the calculator. I hope these examples make sense. Thanks

    Example 1.
    17,500 (1 + x/100)5 = 26,000 // 5 is the power of
    (1 + x/100)1/5 = 26,000/17,500 = 1.4857 // 1/5 is the power of

    Example 2.
    Area in 2000 (0.99)20= 1,545 (0.99)20= 1,264 // 20 is the power of
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  2. #2
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    e^(i*pi)'s Avatar
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    Re: How do I use the calculator to do these formula's

    Quote Originally Posted by tomb View Post
    Can someone tell me what is the process on how to calculate the following examples on the calculator. In other words I don't know how to do these on the calculator. I hope these examples make sense. Thanks

    Example 1.
    17,500 (1 + x/100)5 = 26,000 // 5 is the power of
    (1 + x/100)1/5 = 26,000/17,500 = 1.4857 // 1/5 is the power of

    Example 2.
    Area in 2000 (0.99)20= 1,545 (0.99)20= 1,264 // 20 is the power of

    You should have a button with x^y or ^ on. These indicate powers (the latter is also used to denote powers in plain text)


    (1+x/100)^(1/5) is probably input as
    Code:
    ( 1 + x / 1 0 0 ) ^ ( 1 / 5 )
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