Results 1 to 4 of 4

Math Help - Short maths problem

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Joined
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    42

    Short maths problem

    Hi everyone.

    I'm currently tutoring a 15 year old maths student and his teacher has set an assignment question that's a bit wierd.

    'Using four 6's and the operations (plus, minus, divide, multiply and brackets) make equations equal to the numbers 1 through 9)

    The following examples are given

    66/66 = 1
    6/6 + 6/6 = 2
    (6 + 6 + 6)/6 = 3

    I've got answers for all except for 9. Anyone know how you could make an equation equal to nine?

    Secondly, this is supposed to be a piece of assessment testing basic algebra. I really don't see how this problem can be done algebraically. Am i missing the point of what this teacher is trying to do here?
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  2. #2
    Member garymarkhov's Avatar
    Joined
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    149
    Awards
    1
    Yeah, 0 through 8 are straightforward, even 10 and 12 aren't a problem. I can't figure out 9! I am hesitant to say it's impossible, because plenty of puzzles that look that way turn out not to be... but I wonder. I sure would like to see if someone comes up with the answer!
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  3. #3
    MHF Contributor
    Opalg's Avatar
    Joined
    Aug 2007
    From
    Leeds, UK
    Posts
    4,041
    Thanks
    7
    The example 66/66 = 1 shows that you're allowed to put two sixes together to make 66. So maybe you're also allowed to use a decimal point for .6 = 6/10. Then you could have 9 = \frac6{.6} - \frac66.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Joined
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    42
    Quote Originally Posted by Opalg View Post
    The example 66/66 = 1 shows that you're allowed to put two sixes together to make 66. So maybe you're also allowed to use a decimal point for .6 = 6/10. Then you could have 9 = \frac6{.6} - \frac66.
    Nice work. I'm sure that must be what he's looking for. It's difficult getting all the information second hand from a 15 year old but i'm fairly sure decimals must be allowed for it to work.

    Now if anyone is interested or would just like to do it for fun, the assignment actually asks that it be done not only for four 6's, but also four 7's, four 8's, and four 9's. Knock yourself out everyone.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

Similar Math Help Forum Discussions

  1. Easy (and short) problem
    Posted in the Algebra Forum
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: July 10th 2009, 12:18 AM
  2. Help with one short problem.
    Posted in the Advanced Statistics Forum
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: February 18th 2007, 10:37 PM
  3. Short Calculus Problem!
    Posted in the Calculus Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: November 13th 2006, 07:58 PM
  4. Short Calculus Word Problem
    Posted in the Calculus Forum
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: November 13th 2006, 03:11 PM
  5. A short problem, help me please!
    Posted in the Algebra Forum
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: September 5th 2006, 03:13 PM

Search Tags


/mathhelpforum @mathhelpforum