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Math Help - TSA

  1. #1
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    Unhappy TSA

    How is it calculated?
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by angelmt View Post
    How is it calculated?
    What is "TSA"? If you're referring to "total surface area", the methods involved will vary with the information provided.
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  3. #3
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    Exclamation TSA

    Yes, I was referring to the Total Surface Area of a cube. What's the difference between that and the volume? For example if a cube is 10 cm, how are the volume and the TSA calculated?
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by angelmt View Post
    Yes, I was referring to the Total Surface Area of a cube. What's the difference between that and the volume? For example if a cube is 10 cm, how are the volume and the TSA calculated?
    The Total Surface Area of a shape is the area of its "outer wrapping". This area is measured in squares.

    The Volume of a shape is how much "stuff" you can fit inside it. This "stuff" is measured in cubes.


    Notice that a cube has 6 faces.

    If a cube is 10cm in length (?) then...

    The area of one face is 10^2\textrm{cm}^2 = 100\textrm{cm}^2, therefore the total surface area is 6\times 100\textrm{cm}^2 = 600\textrm{cm}^2.


    Since ten centimetre squares can fit along the length and ten centimetre squares can fit along the width, and ten layers can be stacked, the volume is 10^3\textrm{cm}^3 = 1000\textrm{cm}^3.

    Hope that made sense.
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  5. #5
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    Clarification

    So, if I understood correctly, the 100 cm2 is the length x the width. Now: if a cube is 6cm in length, 4cm in width and 5 cm in height, how woukl I calculate the surface area (volume is l x w x h). Are the surface area and the total surface area the same thing? Thanks for your help
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by angelmt View Post
    So, if I understood correctly, the 100 cm2 is the length x the width. Now: if a cube is 6cm in length, 4cm in width and 5 cm in height, how woukl I calculate the surface area (volume is l x w x h). Are the surface area and the total surface area the same thing? Thanks for your help
    TSA = 2[(6)(4) + (6)(5) + (4)(5)] cm^2.

    I have a feeling that TSA and your understanding of surface area are the same thing.
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