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Math Help - simple fraction question

  1. #1
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    simple fraction question

    ok so does

     <br />
1 \frac {2x^2+y^2}{y}<br />

    equal
     <br />
1 \frac {2x^2+y}{1}<br />

    just confused over the the whole 1.. can i simplify it anymore or multiply the 1 into the fraction some how?
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  2. #2
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    when you multiply anything by 1, nothing happens...so you can cancel that 1 off...

    and the 1st equation doesn't equal the second...the first equation is about as simple as it gets (once you've cancelled the 1)
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jbuckham View Post
    ok so does

     <br />
1 \frac {2x^2+y^2}{y}<br />

    equal
     <br />
1 \frac {2x^2+y}{1}<br />

    just confused over the the whole 1.. can i simplify it anymore or multiply the 1 into the fraction some how?
    No. Because y is not a common factor in the numerator. If it was  1 \frac {2x^2 {\color{red}y} +y^2}{y}<br />
then yes it would.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by mr fantastic View Post
    No. Because y is not a common factor in the numerator. If it was  1 \frac {2x^2 {\color{red}y} +y^2}{y}<br />
then yes it would.
    but isn't \frac {y^2}{y} = y

    ohhh the y has to be involved in all the factors.. hence the common factor comment.. i understand
    thank you
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by shabz View Post
    when you multiply anything by 1, nothing happens...so you can cancel that 1 off...

    and the 1st equation doesn't equal the second...the first equation is about as simple as it gets (once you've cancelled the 1)
    I'm sorry I'm confused here
    see when you have 1 \frac{1}{2} that equals \frac{3}{2}
    which is not 1* \frac{1}{2}
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jbuckham View Post
    I'm sorry I'm confused here
    see when you have 1 \frac{1}{2} that equals \frac{3}{2}
    which is not 1* \frac{1}{2}
    This is just a really unfortunate, ambiguous notation that should never have gone into use. Typically in mathematics, placing one term next to a fraction implies multiplication. But the same is occasionally done to indicate mixed fractions, hence the confusion. For clarity, you should write an explicit plus sign to indicate addition, or parentheses to indicate multiplication.

    1+\frac{2x^2+y^2}y

    =\frac yy+\frac{2x^2+y^2}y

    =\frac{2x^2+y^2+y}y,

    which is not, in general, equal to

    1+2x^2+y.
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