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Math Help - [SOLVED] Convert Pounds per Inch^2 To Newtons per Meter

  1. #1
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    [SOLVED] Convert Pounds per Inch^2 To Newtons per Meter

    Ok the Question Reads:
    Convert 28lb/in^2 to Newtons/m^2. (1lb = 0.2248 Newtons, 1in = 2.540cm)

    This is my incorrect attempt at working it out

    =28*0.2248*254^2
    =406089.5104

    The Correct answer (obtained from a online conversion calculator) is
    193053.2038

    How do I arrive at that answer
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  2. #2
    Member arpitagarwal82's Avatar
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    correct answer is

    (28 * .2248 )/ (1 * .0254)^2
    since 1 inch = .0254 m
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jbuckham View Post
    Ok the Question Reads:
    Convert 28lb/in^2 to Newtons/m^2. (1lb = 0.2248 Newtons, 1in = 2.540cm)
    you got your conversion factor backwards ...

    1 pound force = 4.44822162 newtons


    1 newton = 0.224808943 pounds force
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by arpitagarwal82 View Post
    correct answer is

    (28 * .2248 )/ (1 * .0254)^2
    since 1 inch = .0254 m
    Of COURSE I was converting the cms to meters wrong!
    but
    [/tex](28 * .2248 )/(1 * .0254)^2
    =6.2944/0.00064516
    =9756.33513
    [/tex]
    Which accoding to the online conversion calculator is wrong


    Quote Originally Posted by skeeter View Post
    you got your conversion factor backwards ...

    1 pound force = 4.44822162 newtons


    1 newton = 0.224808943 pounds force
    Not me mate the blinkin' lecturer!
    Last edited by mr fantastic; February 24th 2009 at 07:48 PM. Reason: Merged posts and language modification
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  5. #5
    Member arpitagarwal82's Avatar
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    You got those factors wrong. So if we consider correct factors, answer will be
    28 * 4.44822162/ (.0254)^2

    which is 193053 approx.

    My mistake. I should have cross checked the factors provided by you before answering.
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  6. #6
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    Re: [SOLVED] Convert Pounds per Inch^2 To Newtons per Meter

    Convert Pounds to Euro quickly here. Updated daily Pounds to Euro exchange Rates.
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  7. #7
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    Re: [SOLVED] Convert Pounds per Inch^2 To Newtons per Meter

    Always use units in your conversion calculation.

    28lbf/in2 x 4.448N/lbf x (39.37in/m)2 = 193000 N/m2

    I happen to remember that there are 25.4mm/in. So

    28lbf/in2 x 4.448N/lbf x (1in/25.4mm)2 x (1000mm/m)2 = 193000 N/m2

    If you happen to know that 1N = .2248lbf, then

    28lbf/in2 x 1N/.2248lbf x (39.37in/m)2 = 193000 N/m2

    If you donít use units, you really donít know what you are doing.
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