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Math Help - Negative and zero exponets

  1. #1
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    Negative and zero exponets

    My teacher assigned me this assignment and it looks totally different that what we did... here are a few of the problems...

    X^-2 Y^4

    C^0 D^4

    R^-3 T^5

    There is just a couple of them I just want to get the hang of it so I can do the rest.
    P.S I made this thread in the exponents section but i realized that there is this section... I believe it would be better because it is really urgent.
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by XGBrandon View Post
    My teacher assigned me this assignment and it looks totally different that what we did... here are a few of the problems...

    X^-2 Y^4

    C^0 D^4

    R^-3 T^5

    There is just a couple of them I just want to get the hang of it so I can do the rest.
    P.S I made this thread in the exponents section but i realized that there is this section... I believe it would be better because it is really urgent.
    Hi XGBrandon,

    What were your instructions? Simplify? Get rid of negative exponents?

    x^{-2}y^4=\frac{y^4}{x^2}

    c^0d^4=1d^4=d^4

    r^{-3}t^5=\frac{t^5}{r^3}
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    Quote Originally Posted by masters View Post
    Hi XGBrandon,

    What were your instructions? Simplify? Get rid of negative exponents?

    x^{-2}y^4=\frac{y^4}{x^2}

    c^0d^4=1d^4=d^4

    r^{-3}t^5=\frac{t^5}{r^3}
    get rid of the negative exponent and it has to be in fraction form.,
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    Also htis one is throwing me off...ab^0 c^-4 would it be c^4 ?
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    Quote Originally Posted by XGBrandon View Post
    get rid of the negative exponent and it has to be in fraction form.,
    Ok then. That's what I thought. All are in fraction form except d^4. If you wanted to, I guess you could write it as \frac{d^4}{1}, but I don't know why you would want to.
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    Quote Originally Posted by masters View Post
    Ok then. That's what I thought. All are in fraction form except d^4. If you wanted to, I guess you could write it as \frac{d^4}{1}, but I don't know why you would want to.
    Do you got a instant messenger program?
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    Quote Originally Posted by XGBrandon View Post
    Also htis one is throwing me off...ab^0 c^-4 would it be c^4 ?
    ab^0c^{-4}=\frac{a}{c^4}

    The variable a remains in the numerator. c^{-4} must go to the denominator to have a positive exponent. b^0 is simply 1.
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    another problem I came across is g^7 h^-1 k
    would the answer be K/GH ?
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by XGBrandon View Post
    another problem I came across is g^.7 h^-1 k
    would the answer be K/GH ?
    This one looks a little strange. Is it copied correctly? If so, then

    g^{.7}h^{-1}k=\frac{g^{.7}k}{h} \ \ or \ \ \frac{g^{7/10}k}{h}

    The g and the k term stay in the numerator. The h term moves to the denominator to achieve a positive exponent of 1.

    Remember a few rules:

    a^0=1

    a^{-1}=\frac{1}{a}

    a^{-n}=\frac{1}{a^n}
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  10. #10
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    Masters, I don't see any decimal 7 in the problem. I see g^7 h^-1 k.

    XGBrandon, you have been told, repeatedly, that the negative exponent means it goes into the denominator (with positive exponent). Only the h has a negative exponent. And the "7" exponent on the g doesn't just "disappear".

    g^7h^{-1}k= \frac{gk}{h}
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by HallsofIvy View Post
    Masters, I don't see any decimal 7 in the problem. I see g^7 h^-1 k.

    XGBrandon, you have been told, repeatedly, that the negative exponent means it goes into the denominator (with positive exponent). Only the h has a negative exponent. And the "7" exponent on the g doesn't just "disappear".

    g^7h^{-1}k= \frac{gk}{h}
    Hi HallsofIvy,

    I don't know where that decimal point came from. I just quoted XGB's post and there it was. Made it interesting, though. Spooky!
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