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  1. #1
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    Question division

    how would i work this question out 560 divided by 100 yes i know the answer is 5.6 but i need the workings out if anyone can help i will be very greatfull
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    Quote Originally Posted by andyboy179 View Post
    how would i work this question out 560 divided by 100 yes i know the answer is 5.6 but i need the workings out if anyone can help i will be very greatfull
    This is very easy question.

    Please see this video



    Try to divide by yourself.
    Last edited by Shyam; February 16th 2009 at 11:07 AM.
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  3. #3
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    Here's a useful example: Long Division to Decimal Places
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shyam View Post
    This is very easy question.

    Please see this video



    Try to divide by yourself.
    sorry but that video is rubbish the bloke doesn't tell you anything- on 1 bit hes like do this the this but he doesn't tell you why you are moving it could you please explain it.
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  5. #5
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    because your dividing by 100 you can just move the decimal back two places so: 560 --> to 56 (one place) --> 5.6 (two places)

    but thats a rule that only works for 10,100,1000 etc.... (based on the number of zeros)

    The other way you can do it is using long division but I think it is easier that you look up how to do long division than have me explain it (difficult to explain)
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  6. #6
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    Let's use a simple example to learn long division:

    256 divided by 5

    *side note: a remainder is what is left over after you divide. For example, if you divide 5 by 2 you will get an answer of 2 with a remainder of 1. This is because 2 * 2 = 4 which is one less than the answer we need. So we just call that one extra part a remainder. If I divided 8 by 3, the answer would be 2 with a remainder of 2, because 2 * 3 = 6 which is 2 less than 8.

    To start off, we ask our selves, how many "5" go into 2. The answer is 0, because there is no greater integer than 0 that we could multiply 5 by to make it less than 2. (An integer is a negative or positive "whole" number. ie: -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, etc.) Because we could not find a possible number for the first digit, we put a 0 above it. Now we have to find the remainder. To do this we multiply the digit we multiply that number by whatever you're dividing by (0 * 5 in our case) and place the answer below the 2. We bring it down there so we can subtract what we just multiplied from the original digit. This gives us a remainder. In our situation, we have a 0 below the 2. So, we subtract 2 - 0 and get a remainder of 2. We write two below the two numbers to save the remainder.

    Now we take it a step further. We bring the five down after the remainder (2). What we are trying to solve for now is 25. All we do is repeat the process we performed for the first digit.

    Ask yourself: "How many "5" would go into 25 to make it equal to or less than 25 but have a remainder that is less than 5?"

    We know that 4 * 5 = 20. That's below 25, but let's see if the remainder is less than 5. 20 is 5 more than 25 therefore the remainder is not less than 5; we can't use 4. Let's try one higher: 5. 5 * 5 = 25. That's perfect! Not only does the number result in an answer less than or equal to 25, but it also returns a remainder of 0.

    So now we put a 5 over the the "5" into the original number we're dividing into (256). So far we know that the first two digits of our answer are 0 and 5. Let's find the rest.

    Once again, we multiply "5" by what we're dividing 256 by (5 in this case) and put the solution below the current number we're trying to solve for. In our case we would have 25 - 25. We subtract and get 0. We put 0 below. We bring down the 6 (because it's the next digit in the original number).

    Now we try to solve for 6. 2 * 5 is over 6 (10) so we can't use that. But 1 * 5 = 5 which is less than 6. The remainder of that is 1 which is less than 5. So we know we can use 1. Once again, multiply 1 by 5 and place what you get below the current number you're solving for (6). Now we subtract 6 - 5 = 1.

    We have a remainder of 1.

    This is where there are two possibilities. You have a remainder but you have no more numbers from the original problem to use. If the remainder was 0, you could just stop, but you can't because the remainder is 1. What do you do? Well, the simplest solution would be to just say that the answer is 051 (51) with a remainder of 1. But seeing the answer you got you'd need to go further than that.

    You need to place a decimal place after 256 and imagine there are an infinite amount of zeros after it. After all 256 is the same as 256.0 is the same as 256.000. Be sure to also put a decimal place in your answer (at the same spot) so you don't forget later.

    After you place the decimal spot and another zero, we just repeat the process agin. We bring the 0 down and place it next to the remainder (1). So now we have 10. Well, how many 5s go into 10? 2 * 5 = 10 with a remainder of 0. So we put 2 on top (after the decimal point) and multiply 2 * 5 to put it underneath the number we're trying to solve for currently (10) to subtract. 10 - 10 is 0 so the remainder is 0. Since the remainder is 0, we can stop.

    Our final answer is 051.2 or 51.2.

    I hope this little tutorial helped you understand it better. If you have any more specific questions pm me.
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