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Math Help - please help

  1. #1
    josiemosie
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    please help

    i need help with this problem.

    6 3/6=39/6

    how to do this?
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  2. #2
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    6 3/6 is "six and three-sixths", or "6 ones plus 3 sixths". You want to get this as a number of sixths. Since a one is 6 sixths, the 6 ones are 6 times 6 sixths. So you have 6 times 6 sixths plus 3 sixths, that is, 36 sixths plus 3 sixths, or 39 sixths, which is just 39/6.
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  3. #3
    MHF Contributor Quick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by josiemosie
    i need help with this problem.

    6 3/6=39/6

    how to do this?
    Since rgep's post is a tongue-twister (and since I haven't answered in a while), I shall reexplain.

    we have: 6+\frac{3}{6}

    which you can change to: \overbrace{(36\div 6)}^{\text{notice this equals six}}+\frac{3}{6}

    then we turn it into a fraction: \frac{36}{6}+\frac{3}{6}

    now we add them together: \frac{36+3}{6}

    and so we get: \frac{39}{6}
    Last edited by Quick; August 19th 2006 at 04:09 AM.
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  4. #4
    Eater of Worlds
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    To change a\frac{b}{c} to a improper fraction multiply a times c and add b, all over c

    For instance, in yours, a=6, b=3, c=6

    6*6+3=39; all over c: 39/6

    Which reduces to 13/2.
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  5. #5
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    Hello, josiemosie!

    Where did this problem come from?
    It is very strangely written . . .


    6\,\frac{3}{6}\;=\;\frac{39}{6}

    The truth is: . 6\frac{3}{6}\:=\:\boxed{\frac{13}{2}} . . . Who leaves their fractions unreduced??

    Why didn't they start with 6\frac{1}{2} and simplify to \frac{13}{2} ?


    If we're not supposed to reduce our fractions, we can have:

    . . Show that: . 1\frac{300}{500} \:=\:\frac{13,840}{8,650} . . . It makes as much sense.

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