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Thread: 3rd Conversion Problem / Question

  1. #1
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    3rd Conversion Problem / Question

    Thank You for the Help!

    -qbkr21

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  2. #2
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    There are approx. 28.32 liters in a cubic foot. Go from there?.
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  3. #3
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    RE:

    I know I have to convert, but before I do so is the 12.5 x 15.5 x 8.0 the length that needs to be cubed to equal the volume?
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  4. #4
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    $\displaystyle 1\ ft = 0.3048\ m$

    So to get the volume in $\displaystyle m^3$, you do this calulcation:

    $\displaystyle 12.5 \cdot 15.5 \cdot 8.0\ ft^3 = 12.5 \cdot 15.5 \cdot 8.0 \cdot 0.3048^3\ m^3$

    $\displaystyle 1\ m^3 = 1000\ liters$

    So you have:

    $\displaystyle 12.5 \cdot 15.5 \cdot 8.0 \cdot 0.3048^3 \cdot 1000\ liters$

    I think you can handle it from here.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spec View Post
    $\displaystyle 1\ ft = 0.3048\ m$

    So to get the volume in $\displaystyle m^3$, you do this calulcation:

    $\displaystyle 12.5 \cdot 15.5 \cdot 8.0\ ft^3 = 12.5 \cdot 15.5 \cdot 8.0 \cdot 0.3048^3\ m^3$

    $\displaystyle 1\ m^3 = 1000\ liters$

    So you have:

    $\displaystyle 12.5 \cdot 15.5 \cdot 8.0 \cdot 0.3048^3 \cdot 1000\ liters$

    I think you can handle it from here.
    What I am not understanding how to ft. to ft.^3 . Seems like if you cubed the ft.^3 you would have to originally cube the numbers $\displaystyle 12.5 \cdot 15.5 \cdot 8.0\ $ too. The problem never mention the room was measured in feet cubed just feet.
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  6. #6
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    $\displaystyle 12.5\ ft \cdot 15.5\ ft \cdot 8.0\ ft = 1550\ ft \cdot ft \cdot ft = 1550\ ft^3$

    A room is three-dimensional, so it makes sense that the unit for describing the volume of a room is also three-dimensional.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spec View Post
    $\displaystyle 12.5\ ft \cdot 15.5\ ft \cdot 8.0\ ft = 1550\ ft \cdot ft \cdot ft = 1550\ ft^3$

    A room is three-dimensional, so it makes sense that the unit for describing the volume of a room is also three-dimensional.
    See this is what I mean wording. You just gave me a big heads up and I thank you.
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  8. #8
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    RE:

    RE:

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