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Thread: Fractions problem

  1. #1
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    Fractions problem

    How can I show that $\displaystyle \frac {3}{10} $ is $\displaystyle \frac {1}{7} $ of the way from $\displaystyle \frac {1}{4} $ to $\displaystyle \frac {3}{5} $?
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by sarahh View Post
    How can I show that $\displaystyle 3/10 $ is $\displaystyle 1/7 $ of the way from $\displaystyle 1/4 $ to $\displaystyle 3/5 $?
    First you need to find out the length of "the whole way" from $\displaystyle \frac{1}{4}$ to $\displaystyle \frac{3}{5}$, which you do by subtraction:

    $\displaystyle \frac{3}{5} - \frac{1}{4} = \frac{12}{20} - \frac{5}{20} = \frac{7}{20}$.

    So what's 1/7 of 7/20? 1/20. So now the question becomes, is $\displaystyle \frac{3}{10}$ a distance of $\displaystyle \frac{1}{20}$ from $\displaystyle \frac{1}{4}$?

    $\displaystyle \frac{3}{10} - \frac{1}{4} = \frac{6}{20} - \frac{5}{20} = \frac{1}{20}$

    and the answer is yes.
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  3. #3
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    But how would you prove it without using 3/10 to show it? If you didn't know it was 3/10?
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by sarahh View Post
    But how would you prove it without using 3/10 to show it? If you didn't know it was 3/10?
    We figured out that $\displaystyle \frac{3}{5}$ and $\displaystyle \frac{1}{4}$ are $\displaystyle \frac{7}{20}$ apart. So a number which is $\displaystyle \frac{1}{7}$ of the way from $\displaystyle \frac{1}{4}$ to $\displaystyle \frac{3}{5}$ is going to be a distance of $\displaystyle \frac{1}{20}$ from $\displaystyle \frac{1}{4}$. Therefore, the desired answer is $\displaystyle \frac{1}{4} + \frac{1}{20} = \frac{5}{20} + \frac{1}{20} = \frac{6}{20} = \frac{3}{10}$.
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  5. #5
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    Ahhh that makes sense. Thanks so much iceman!
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