Results 1 to 6 of 6

Math Help - 20 Hard SAT questions from the official guide.

  1. #1
    Newbie Potterpie's Avatar
    Joined
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    12

    20 Hard SAT questions from the official guide.

    I'm a freshman in high school and I'm taking a SAT prep course my district is offering. We have workbooks and stuff and we have the Official SAT Study Guide, that monstrous, huge, book. I went through the whole math section (because my score is only a 550) and picked out the questions labeled "hard" so I could have a better understanding.

    I worked through all of them and I have 20, no exaggeration, that I absolutely cannot understand.

    Here's an example.

    If n and p are integers greater than 1 and if p is a factor of both n+3 and n+10, what is the value of p?

    I've tried calling my teacher (who gave us his cell phone number), but he didn't answer. I would ask my math teacher, but he doesn't tutor on the day I would have to go.

    If you think you can help me, you really good math people, please reply.
    Last edited by Potterpie; April 26th 2008 at 04:22 PM. Reason: replacing example I haven't figured yet.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  2. #2
    Behold, the power of SARDINES!
    TheEmptySet's Avatar
    Joined
    Feb 2008
    From
    Yuma, AZ, USA
    Posts
    3,764
    Thanks
    78
    Quote Originally Posted by Potterpie View Post
    I'm a freshman in high school and I'm taking a SAT prep course my district is offering. We have workbooks and stuff and we have the Official SAT Study Guide, that monstrous, huge, book. I went through the whole math section (because my score is only a 550) and picked out the questions labeled "hard" so I could have a better understanding.

    I worked through all of them and I have 20, no exaggeration, that I absolutely cannot understand.

    Here's an example.

    If 2x+z=2y and 2x+2y+z=20, what is the value of y?

    I've tried setting up a matrix, but I get an error message when I try to solve. I've solved for y and graphed. I've double checked. The answer is supposed to be 5, but how am I supposed to get that?

    I've tried calling my teacher (who gave us his cell phone number), but he didn't answer. I would ask my math teacher, but he doesn't tutor on the day I would have to go.

    If you think you can help me, you really good math people, please reply.
    we know that 2x+z=2y

    rewrite the 2nd equation as

    2x+2y+z=20 \iff 2x+z+2y=20 \iff \underbrace{2y}_{2x+z}+2y=20

    4y=20 \iff y=5
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  3. #3
    Newbie Potterpie's Avatar
    Joined
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    12
    Omg. Thanks so much! Can I PM you for more help?
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  4. #4
    Behold, the power of SARDINES!
    TheEmptySet's Avatar
    Joined
    Feb 2008
    From
    Yuma, AZ, USA
    Posts
    3,764
    Thanks
    78
    Quote Originally Posted by Potterpie View Post
    Omg. Thanks so much! Can I PM you for more help?
    Please post your questions in the forum. There are many people here that can help you, and most are much "smerter" than I.

    P.S. I did mean Smerter "It is more prestigious than smarter" quoting Jen
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  5. #5
    Newbie Potterpie's Avatar
    Joined
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    12
    allrighty. =)

    I posted the next question I have in my first post.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  6. #6
    MHF Contributor
    Joined
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    1,092
    Quote Originally Posted by Potterpie View Post
    I'm a freshman in high school and I'm taking a SAT prep course my district is offering. We have workbooks and stuff and we have the Official SAT Study Guide, that monstrous, huge, book. I went through the whole math section (because my score is only a 550) and picked out the questions labeled "hard" so I could have a better understanding.

    I worked through all of them and I have 20, no exaggeration, that I absolutely cannot understand.

    Here's an example.

    If n and p are integers greater than 1 and if p is a factor of both n+3 and n+10, what is the value of p?

    I've tried calling my teacher (who gave us his cell phone number), but he didn't answer. I would ask my math teacher, but he doesn't tutor on the day I would have to go.

    If you think you can help me, you really good math people, please reply.
    Ok so you know p divides both n+3 and n+10. That also means that p divides the difference between n+3 and n+10, which is 7. So p must be equal to 7, since p is prime and greater than 1.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

Similar Math Help Forum Discussions

  1. Few hard questions
    Posted in the Calculus Forum
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: September 25th 2010, 08:39 AM
  2. Hard Questions
    Posted in the Geometry Forum
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: October 7th 2009, 10:48 PM
  3. 4 Hard Questions!! Help Please!!
    Posted in the Calculus Forum
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: August 3rd 2009, 06:08 PM
  4. Hard questions are here...
    Posted in the Geometry Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: January 23rd 2009, 08:17 AM
  5. Really hard questions...
    Posted in the Geometry Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: June 2nd 2008, 10:13 PM

Search Tags


/mathhelpforum @mathhelpforum