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Math Help - Question-2

  1. #1
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    Exclamation Question-2

    x,y,z are different counting numbers.


    What is the highest value for -2x-5y-3z


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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnerdem View Post
    x,y,z are different counting numbers.


    What is the highest value for -2x-5y-3z


    Is 0 a counting number? If so, the answer is 0. Otherwise, put in 1 for each of x, y, and z to get -10.
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  3. #3
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    Answer is

    Counting numbers doesnt include 0. They are: (1,2,3,4,5................)

    And also x,y,z are supposed to be different



    The answer for the question is -17 on answer key but i dont know how to do
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnerdem View Post
    x,y,z are different counting numbers.


    What is the highest value for -2x-5y-3z


    Ok if the numbers need to be distinct, then you will obviously want to use the smallest numbers, which are 1, 2, and 3. Then substitute in the values for x, y, z that make -2x-5y-3z the closest to zero it can be. Since y has the highest coefficient, you want to put y = 1. Similarly, z has the next highest, so put z = 2, and finally x = 3. Then -2(3)-5(1)-3(2) = -17.
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  5. #5
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    The answer depends upon which side of the zero argument you come down on.
    Counting Number -- from Wolfram MathWorld

    If zero is a counting number then the answer is 7. How?

    If zero is not a counting number then what is the? Why?
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