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  1. #1
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    Angry Question-1

    Question says;

    If A and B are positive numbers




    How many different numbers can a be?

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  2. #2
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    Hello,

    $\displaystyle a^2-b^2=(a-b)(a+b)$

    How many possibilities are there for a and b, being positive ?
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  3. #3
    Grand Panjandrum
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnerdem View Post
    Question says;

    If A and B are positive numbers




    How many different numbers can a be?

    You have $\displaystyle \frac{a^2-b^2}{a-b}=10,\ a,b \in \mathbb{Z}_+$

    So (as $\displaystyle a \ne b$ ):

    $\displaystyle a^2-b^2=10(a-b)\ \ \ \ \ ...(1)$

    but $\displaystyle a^2-b^2=(a+b)(a-b)$ , so $\displaystyle (1)$ becomes:

    $\displaystyle a+b=10\ \ \ \ \ ...(1)$

    Now just enumerate the posibilities for $\displaystyle a$

    RonL
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