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Thread: Body Temperature

  1. #1
    Super Member harpazo's Avatar
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    Body Temperature

    Normal human body temperature is 98.6 F. A temperature x that differs from normal by at least 1.5 F is considered unhealthy. A formula that describes this is
    |x - 98.6| ≥ 1.5 is given.

    A. Show that a temperature of 97F is unhealthy.
    B. Show that a temperature of 100F is NOT unhealthy.

    Question:

    Must I tackle this problem similar to the Foreign Household Voltage question posted the other day?
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  2. #2
    MHF Contributor
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    Re: Body Temperature

    Sub the values in and see if the statement is true.
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    Super Member harpazo's Avatar
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    Re: Body Temperature

    Quote Originally Posted by Debsta View Post
    Sub the values in and see if the statement is true.
    Cool. I was right again. I will show my work this afternoon. Going to bed now. Three minutes after 4am now.
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  4. #4
    Super Member harpazo's Avatar
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    Re: Body Temperature

    Quote Originally Posted by Debsta View Post
    Sub the values in and see if the statement is true.

    |x - 98.6| ≥ 1.5

    A. Show that a temperature of 97F is unhealthy.

    Let x = 97

    |97 - 98.6| ≥ 1.5

    |-1.6| ≥ 1.5

    1.6 ≥ 1.5

    Unhealthy temperature.


    B. Show that a temperature of 100F is NOT unhealthy.

    Let x = 100

    |x - 98.6| ≥ 1.5

    |100 - 98.6| ≥ 1.5

    |1.4| ≥ 1.5

    1.4 IS NOT greater than or equal to 1.5.

    Temperature is NOT unhealthy.
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