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Thread: Writing Fraction as Product of Two Fractions

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    Member cmf0106's Avatar
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    Writing Fraction as Product of Two Fractions

    Confused about a few examples from a math book, why in the top example is the * included, but no * operator is used in the bottom example? The book is performing similar actions on both expressions. Is this perhaps a typo on the authors part?

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    Re: Writing Fraction as Product of Two Fractions

    it's probably just a typo

    being next to one another with no intervening symbol is equivalent to multiplication so both are correct
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    Re: Writing Fraction as Product of Two Fractions

    It's possible they used an operator in the top example so the result would not be confused with a mixed fraction.
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    Member cmf0106's Avatar
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    Re: Writing Fraction as Product of Two Fractions

    Quote Originally Posted by romsek View Post
    it's probably just a typo

    being next to one another with no intervening symbol is equivalent to multiplication so both are correct
    Quote Originally Posted by MarkFL View Post
    It's possible they used an operator in the top example so the result would not be confused with a mixed fraction.


    Thanks for the feedback. Yes this is where I am confused because earlier in the book they mention when a whole number is sitting next to a fraction, it is the same as addition as shown in the attached image.

    But for the example I used in the original post, 2 1/x+1, that does not have a multiplication symbol - so that is a typo then? Because otherwise according to the book this would be the equivalent of 2 + (1/x+1) with no sign.

    Writing Fraction as Product of Two Fractions-ycvbih6.png
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    Re: Writing Fraction as Product of Two Fractions

    Quote Originally Posted by cmf0106 View Post
    Thanks for the feedback. Yes this is where I am confused because earlier in the book they mention when a whole number is sitting next to a fraction, it is the same as addition as shown in the attached image.

    But for the example I used in the original post, 2 1/x+1, that does not have a multiplication symbol - so that is a typo then? Because otherwise according to the book this would be the equivalent of 2 + (1/x+1) with no sign.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    ok... what's going on here is the difference between two numbers associated together via an operator vs. 2 numbers that make up a single number that includes a fraction.

    For example consider the expression $2\dfrac 1 4$

    This certainly can mean the single number that is equivalent to $2+\dfrac 1 4 = \dfrac 9 4$

    It also can stand for $2 * \dfrac 1 4 = \dfrac 1 2$

    It's really impossible to tell which without context.

    I would add that using the first form with anything but strictly numbers is rarely if ever seen.

    So the expression $2\dfrac {1}{x+1}$ would always stand for $2 * \dfrac{1}{x+1}$ and not $2 + \dfrac{1}{x+1}$
    Last edited by romsek; Jun 21st 2018 at 06:03 AM.
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    Member cmf0106's Avatar
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    Re: Writing Fraction as Product of Two Fractions

    Here is what it states in the book. "For example 1 1/5 (which is really 1 + 1/5) is a mixed number. We will practice going back and forth between the two forms".
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    Re: Writing Fraction as Product of Two Fractions

    Quote Originally Posted by romsek View Post
    I find that tough to believe that they say a whole number sitting next to a fraction means addition. It never has. You'll always see a plus sign when addition is intended.
    You have been doing advanced math for too long. The OP is, indeed, correct that in very basic level mathematics texts, a "mixed fraction" is one that includes whole numbers plus a fraction (and the plus sign is assumed).

    https://www.mathsisfun.com/mixed-fractions.html
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    Re: Writing Fraction as Product of Two Fractions

    Quote Originally Posted by SlipEternal View Post
    You have been doing advanced math for too long. The OP is, indeed, correct that in very basic level mathematics texts, a "mixed fraction" is one that includes whole numbers plus a fraction (and the plus sign is assumed).

    https://www.mathsisfun.com/mixed-fractions.html
    I corrected and expanded upon this answer.
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