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Math Help - Linear scale

  1. #1
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    Linear scale

    Hi everyone, a friend of mine told me about this forum. She has recieved alot of help on here. Im hoping someone can help me out.

    I am taking online classes, I am taking contemporary math and we are working with linear equations. Im sure this is simple to figure out but im just not grabbing the concept.

    The question is as follows:
    A dollhouse and their furnishings are usually built to a scale of exactly 1in. to 1ft meaning that an item 1 foot long in a real house is 1 in long in a dollhouse.

    1-What is the linear scaling factor for a dollhouse?
    2-If a dollhouse were made of the same materials as a real house, how would their weights compare?

    Does No. 1 work out to be 12 square=144 or 12. or am I way off? PLEASE HELP!!
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by crazykitty View Post
    Hi everyone, a friend of mine told me about this forum. She has recieved alot of help on here. Im hoping someone can help me out.

    I am taking online classes, I am taking contemporary math and we are working with linear equations. Im sure this is simple to figure out but im just not grabbing the concept.

    The question is as follows:
    A dollhouse and their furnishings are usually built to a scale of exactly 1in. to 1ft meaning that an item 1 foot long in a real house is 1 in long in a dollhouse.

    1-What is the linear scaling factor for a dollhouse?
    2-If a dollhouse were made of the same materials as a real house, how would their weights compare?

    Does No. 1 work out to be 12 square=144 or 12. or am I way off? PLEASE HELP!!
    No. 1: 12'' = 1 ft therefore 1'' to 12'' therefore the scale is 1:12.

    No. 2: Assume weight depends on the volume. The unit of volume is cubic ft, that is (ft)(ft)(ft) = (12")(12")(12") = 12^3 cubic inches. So you'd expect the weight of the real house to be 12^3 = (calculator time) times the weight of the dollhouse.
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  3. #3
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    Mr Fantastic

    Thanks!!!!!!
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