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Math Help - My unsolvable algebra problem

  1. #1
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    My unsolvable algebra problem

    I think this problem is unsolvable, but I may be wrong.

    "If the sum of three consecutive EVEN integers is equal to 14 less the first integer plus twice the second, find the values of all three integers."

    Ok I tried and I always got a 16 number difference. I did a range of random numbers between 0 and 300. Can someone tell me what I'm doing wrong or if I'm correct.
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  2. #2
    is up to his old tricks again! Jhevon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Itachi888Uchiha View Post
    I think this problem is unsolvable, but I may be wrong.

    "If the sum of three consecutive EVEN integers is equal to 14 less the first integer plus twice the second, find the values of all three integers."

    Ok I tried and I always got a 16 number difference. I did a range of random numbers between 0 and 300. Can someone tell me what I'm doing wrong or if I'm correct.
    let the first integer be n, then the second is n + 2, and the third is n + 4.

    thus we have: n + n + 2 + n + 4 = n + 2(n + 2) - 14

    now solve for n, then you can find all the integers.
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  3. #3
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    I think there's a flaw in your formula

    Quote Originally Posted by Jhevon View Post
    let the first integer be n, then the second is n + 2, and the third is n + 4.

    thus we have: n + n + 2 + n + 4 = n + 2(n + 2) - 14

    now solve for n, then you can find all the integers.
    The equation that you have on the right of the equation is in the wrong order isn't it? I put that n + P + R=(n-14) + 2P
    P=n+2
    R=N+4
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    is up to his old tricks again! Jhevon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Itachi888Uchiha View Post
    The equation that you have on the right of the equation is in the wrong order isn't it? I put that n + P + R=(n-14) + 2P
    P=n+2
    R=N+4
    really? is there a difference between saying (1 - 2) and (-2 + 1)? no, there isn't, they are both equal to -1. i will say i do not like the fact that you grouped the -14 with the n though. that could come back to haunt you had the question been more complicated. the 14 is not linked to the n directly according to the question. don't write it like that
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  5. #5
    Member Henderson's Avatar
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    Be careful here. Does the problem say "14 less the first integer" or "14 less than the first integer"? The way you have originally stated the problem, your translated equation would be:

    n + n+2 + n+4 = 14-n + 2(n+2)

    FWIW, the only time I've ever phrasing like this is in math books, doing these type of problems.
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  6. #6
    is up to his old tricks again! Jhevon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Henderson View Post
    Be careful here. Does the problem say "14 less the first integer" or "14 less than the first integer"? The way you have originally stated the problem, your translated equation would be:

    n + n+2 + n+4 = 14-n + 2(n+2)

    FWIW, the only time I've ever phrasing like this is in math books, doing these type of problems.
    indeed! the absence of "than" makes a difference. i interpreted it as if "than" was there
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Henderson View Post
    Be careful here. Does the problem say "14 less the first integer" or "14 less than the first integer"? The way you have originally stated the problem, your translated equation would be:

    n + n+2 + n+4 = 14-n + 2(n+2)

    FWIW, the only time I've ever phrasing like this is in math books, doing these type of problems.
    It says 14 less the first integer.
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  8. #8
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    Thanks guy

    Quote Originally Posted by Henderson View Post
    Be careful here. Does the problem say "14 less the first integer" or "14 less than the first integer"? The way you have originally stated the problem, your translated equation would be:

    n + n+2 + n+4 = 14-n + 2(n+2)

    FWIW, the only time I've ever phrasing like this is in math books, doing these type of problems.
    When you told me that, I solved the problem instantly. The answer is 6,8,10.
    Man this is just reading comprehension, but the problem was written in a fuzzy way. Uh oh I better go to sleep so I'm not tired in the mornin'.
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