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Math Help - Another problem, almost done :)

  1. #1
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    Another problem, almost done :)

    Solve: 1/(x-2) less then or equal to 0


    Also having trouble with: "Suppose that a polynomial function of degree 4 with rational coefficients has -4, -5, -4, -i as zeros. Find the other zeros.
    A)4,5,-4,i
    B)4 + i
    C)-4 + i
    D) -4, -i


    Thank you captain black!
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  2. #2
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    earboth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kharris82
    Solve: 1/(x-2) less then or equal to 0

    Also having trouble with: "Suppose that a polynomial function of degree 4 with rational coefficients has -4, -5, -4, -i as zeros. Find the other zeros.
    A)4,5,-4,i
    B)4 + i
    C)-4 + i
    D) -4, -i

    Thank you captain black!
    Hello,

    I can offer you some help with your first problem. But I don't know what to do with your 2nd problem: The given list of zeros looks a little bit funny to me (for instance why is the (-4) listed twice?).

    to 1.: You're looking for negative quotient with a positive numerator. That is only possible if the nominator is negative:
    \frac{1}{x-2}\leq 0\ \Longrightarrow \ x-2<0 \ \Longrightarrow \ x<2

    Greetings

    EB
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  3. #3
    Forum Admin topsquark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kharris82
    Solve: 1/(x-2) less then or equal to 0


    Also having trouble with: "Suppose that a polynomial function of degree 4 with rational coefficients has -4, -5, -4, -i as zeros. Find the other zeros.
    A)4,5,-4,i
    B)4 + i
    C)-4 + i
    D) -4, -i


    Thank you captain black!
    As to the second problem, if the polynomial (with rational coefficients) is of degree 4 then it has at most 4 distinct roots. In addition, if a complex root of a polynomial function with rational coefficients exists, then the complex conjugate of that root is also a root. For that reason, "i" must also be a root of this polynomial. But that means your polynomial is of degree 5, not 4.

    I don't understand what they mean by "find the other zeros." You've already got four listed!

    Something's fishy here.

    -Dan
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