Results 1 to 5 of 5
Like Tree1Thanks
  • 1 Post By HallsofIvy

Math Help - Linear Relationships

  1. #1
    Member
    Joined
    Jan 2013
    From
    Australia
    Posts
    170
    Thanks
    3

    Linear Relationships

    Just brushing up on my linear relationships skills before an upcoming assessment task, any help would be much appreciated.

    1) (6,3) is the midpoint of the line joining the points (-4, y) and (x, -6). The value of x + y is?

    2) The straight line with equation ax + by = c passes through the points (2, 4) and (-3, 1). Find the values of a, b and c.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  2. #2
    MHF Contributor

    Joined
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    18,788
    Thanks
    1683
    Awards
    1

    Re: Linear Relationships

    Quote Originally Posted by Fratricide View Post
    Just brushing up on my linear relationships skills before an upcoming assessment task, any help would be much appreciated.

    1) (6,3) is the midpoint of the line joining the points (-4, y) and (x, -6). The value of x + y is?

    2) The straight line with equation ax + by = c passes through the points (2, 4) and (-3, 1). Find the values of a, b and c.
    Why don't you post some of your own work?
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  3. #3
    Member
    Joined
    Jan 2013
    From
    Australia
    Posts
    170
    Thanks
    3

    Re: Linear Relationships

    Because I have no idea where to start with these.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  4. #4
    MHF Contributor

    Joined
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    15,953
    Thanks
    1629

    Re: Linear Relationships

    So you do not know how to find the "midpoint of the line segment with endpoint (x_1, y_1) and (x_2, y_2)? It is given by \left(\frac{x_1+ x_2}{2}, \frac{y_1+ y_2}{2}\right). Can you start now?

    For 2, put x= 2, y= 4 into the equation to get 2a+ 4b= c, then do the same with x= -3, y= 1 to get -3a+ b= c. That gives two equations to solve for a, b, and c. Of course, there is no single solution. If a, b, c satisfy this so does any multiple.
    Thanks from Fratricide
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  5. #5
    Member
    Joined
    Jan 2013
    From
    Australia
    Posts
    170
    Thanks
    3

    Re: Linear Relationships

    I did know about that formula for the midpoint, but was unsure on how to use it specifically for this question. However, after realising that two points are equal whenever their corresponding coordinates are the same, I was able to solve that question embarrassingly easily.

    As for the second question, how would I go about solving for a, b and c? As you said, there is no single solution, but how would I get an integral solution? (I remember the text book had an integral answer, but I don't have it on me at the moment.)
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

Similar Math Help Forum Discussions

  1. Proving Set Relationships
    Posted in the Discrete Math Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: October 31st 2012, 01:34 AM
  2. Patterns and relationships
    Posted in the Algebra Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: May 16th 2012, 11:59 PM
  3. Volumes - Linear Relationships
    Posted in the Calculus Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: July 17th 2010, 08:50 PM
  4. Relationships between Max and Min
    Posted in the Calculus Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: October 31st 2008, 03:39 AM
  5. Linear vs. Proportional relationships
    Posted in the Algebra Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: May 14th 2008, 04:34 AM

Search Tags


/mathhelpforum @mathhelpforum