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Math Help - Inverted Parabola

  1. #1
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    Inverted Parabola



    How do I find the vertex?
    I set y to zero then I get -3? I think.
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  2. #2
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    Re: Inverted Parabola

    Can you find the vertex of x=y^2 ?

    Your function is stretched and shifted version of x=y^2. Identify the transformation and you will see where the new vertex is.
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  3. #3
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    Re: Inverted Parabola

    No, you do NOT set y equal to 0. That would give the y-intercept which, in general, has nothing to with the vertex.

    Since a square is never 0, x= 3(y+1)^2- 3, is never less than -3. It is -3 when the square is 0- that is, when y+ 1= 0.
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  4. #4
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    Re: Inverted Parabola

    it helps to write out the standard form formula. then you can see what its telling you.

    f(x)=a(x-h)^2+k vertex=(h,k)

    you also know your values are inverted.
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