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Math Help - Factorising an expression?

  1. #1
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    Factorising an expression?

    Sometimes I think that just a little discussion can make all the difference if like minded people can help each other out

    I am asked to factorise the following expression;

    6p^3 - 4pq + 2p. This I understand to be reverse engineering, but I seem to struggle with it at the moment?

    6p^3 - 4pq + 2p = 6p^2 (p - 2pq + 2)

    Now if I say; 6p^2 x p = 6p^3 - 2 x 2pq +2)

    result; 6p^3 - 4pq + 2

    My problem seems to be what happend to the "p" at the end with 2? i.e. 2p?

    Thanks for any help

    I think I have worked out the following solution?

    6p^3 - 2q + 1 = 6p^2 (p - 2q + 1) = 6p^3 - 4pq +2p

    Not sure if i am right though?
    Last edited by David Green; May 4th 2011 at 11:21 AM. Reason: Additional understanding
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  2. #2
    A riddle wrapped in an enigma
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Green View Post
    Sometimes I think that just a little discussion can make all the difference if like minded people can help each other out

    I am asked to factorise the following expression;

    6p^3 - 4pq + 2p. This I understand to be reverse engineering, but I seem to struggle with it at the moment?

    6p^3 - 4pq + 2p = 6p^2 (p - 2pq + 2)

    Now if I say; 6p^2 x p = 6p^3 - 2 x 2pq +2)

    result; 6p^3 - 4pq + 2

    My problem seems to be what happend to the "p" at the end with 2? i.e. 2p?

    Thanks for any help
    Hi David Green,

    6p^3-4pq+2p

    First, you need to factor out the common monomial factor which is 2p, not 6p^2

    Then you will arrive at 2p(3p^2-2q+1)

    And from there I don't see anything else to do.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by masters View Post
    Hi David Green,

    6p^3-4pq+2p

    First, you need to factor out the common monomial factor which is 2p, not 6p^2

    Then you will arrive at 2p(3p^2-2q+1)

    And from there I don't see anything else to do.
    Thanks for that, it is just what I required. Now I understand I think?

    6p^3 - 4pq + 2p reverse engineered

    move the 2p to the LHS; 2p (3p^2, this equals 6p^3, then 2p x 2q = 4pq and the + 1 is the remaining p

    Thanks alot much appreciated.

    David
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