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Math Help - What is a term?

  1. #1
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    What is a term?

    a term is either a single number or variable, or the product of several numbers or variables separated from another term by a + or - sign in an overall expression. For example, in 3 + 4x + 5yzw 3, 4x, and 5yzw are all terms. -wikipedia


    But it says either a single number...or the product of the several numbers.


    So does that mean that 4 is a term, x is a term, and y,z,and w are also terms? In that case how does it affect things like the associative property, does it not allow for an anarchic rewriting of the original expression?
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  2. #2
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    the 5xyz etc are all terms as is the 4
    the individual components of each term are either constants such as the 5 or variables like the x

    if you have studied polynomials then you are familiar with the expression terms in a polynomial

    However, as can be seen hereArithmetic and Geometric Sequences

    a term can be a combination of elements...
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  3. #3
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    Re: What is a term?

    But what would make the elements of a term not terms too? Or are they terms?
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