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Math Help - Factor's equations

  1. #1
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    Factor's equations

    Hi, I have a bit of a problem with a few task.

    "Factories the following equation with help of the zeropoints (which I have no idea what it means).

    a) x2 - 4x + 3

    b) x^2 - x - 2

    c) a^2 +2a - 15

    d) y^2 + 11y + 28
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by greensnake View Post
    Hi, I have a bit of a problem with a few task.

    "Factories the following equation with help of the zeropoints (which I have no idea what it means).

    a) x2 - 4x + 3

    b) x^2 - x - 2

    c) a^2 +2a - 15

    d) y^2 + 11y + 28
    Gee, greensnake, you should have a little clue or you should not have been given this assignment.

    1) It's "factor". "Factories" is something else all together and "factorize" is quite excessive.

    2) A "zeropoint" is likely to be a value of the variable that makes the entire expression equal to zero (0).

    For a), try x = 1 x^2 - 4x + 3 ==> 1^2 - 4(1) + 3 = 1 - 4 + 3 = 0!!

    For general factoring, WRITE DOWN what you know.

    For a) x^2 - 4x + 3 = (x - ___)(x - ___) This much can be seen immediately, since whatever the two missing numbers are must sum to -4 and multiply to +3. (If you do not know why this is, you need a much more fundamental review.) You just have to find the missing numbers with those properties. Generally, a nice search from the factors of 3 is a good place to get started. In this case, just 1 and 3 do the trick and we have:

    x^2 - 4x + 3 = (x - 1)(x - 3)

    From the factored form, the "zeropoints" are obvious. x = 1 and x = 3.

    Okay, you do the next one.
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