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Math Help - need help solving a demand function

  1. #1
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    need help solving a demand function

    The demand for a certain fraternity's plastic brownie dishes is q(p) = 360,000 − (p + 1)2
    where q represents the number of brownie dishes that the fraternity can sell each month at a price of p. Determine the number of brownie dishes the fraternity can sell each month if the price is set at 60.
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  2. #2
    Behold, the power of SARDINES!
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    Quote Originally Posted by theski232 View Post
    The demand for a certain fraternity's plastic brownie dishes is q(p) = 360,000 − (p + 1)2
    where q represents the number of brownie dishes that the fraternity can sell each month at a price of p. Determine the number of brownie dishes the fraternity can sell each month if the price is set at 60.
    Since you know that value of p just evaluate the function

    q(60)=360000-(60+1)^2=...
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  3. #3
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    I was doing that but general knowledge led me to believe that 60cents is the same as 0.60. That is where I had my problem.
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